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An investigation into peripheral physiological markers that predict monotony

Steele, Troy, Cutmore, Tim, James, Daniel A., & Rakotonirainy, Andry (2004) An investigation into peripheral physiological markers that predict monotony. In 2004 Road Safety Research, Policing and Education Conference, 14-16 November 2004, Perth, WA.

Abstract

Behavioural performance gradually declines when individuals perform monotonous tasks. The road safety research community tends to agree that driver monotony alters driving performance, especially for professional drivers. Monotony is a well known but poorly understood driver state that can lead to road crashes. With sophisticated instrumentation it is possible to determine if a driver or test subject is likely to be in these or similar states. This paper investigates the state of monotony to determine if relatively simple instrumentation can measure wether or not a driver is likely to be in or approaching this state. First the Mackworth clock test, a well known protocol for producing a monotonous state is reproduced in a laboratory based experiment. A number of physiological indicators and Electroencephalograph (EEG) are monitored during the experiment. The stimuli (event) contains 24 different targets the participant reacts to during a 1-hour testing session. The state of monotony is verified by continuous EEG recording, a baseline is determined by examining pre and post event activity. A range of possible peripheral measures are then also simultaneously recorded such as Galvanic Skin Response (GSR), Electrocardiogram (EKG), Electrooculograph (EOG), Electromyograph EMG and 3D head tilt (using a custom built accelerometer based device) together with user inputs. Preliminary results from a test pool of eight subjects indicates that some of these peripheral physiological measures may contain markers that correlate well with alpha and theta EEG activity, thus indicating the state of monotony. A sensor that shows a lot of promise for future research is the GSR. Inexpensive instrumentation and an in-car based test procedure are recommended for further investigation in order to develop a sustainable Monotony Diagnosis Module (MDM).

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ID Code: 10035
Item Type: Conference Paper
Additional Information: The contents of this conference can be freely accessed online via the conference’s web page (see hypertext link).
Additional URLs:
ISBN: 0730724921
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100) > Sensory Processes Perception and Performance (170112)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Preventive Medicine (111716)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > COMMERCE MANAGEMENT TOURISM AND SERVICES (150000) > TRANSPORTATION AND FREIGHT SERVICES (150700) > Road Transportation and Freight Services (150703)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > ENGINEERING (090000) > ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING (090600) > Signal Processing (090609)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100) > Biological Psychology (Neuropsychology Psychopharmacology Physiological Psychology) (170101)
Divisions: Current > Research Centres > Centre for Accident Research & Road Safety - Qld (CARRS-Q)
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2004 (please consult author)
Deposited On: 10 Oct 2007
Last Modified: 29 Feb 2012 23:06

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