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Masculinity Delinquency and the Risky Road Use Behaviour of Young Male Offenders

Williams, Clive K. (2002) Masculinity Delinquency and the Risky Road Use Behaviour of Young Male Offenders. In 2002 Road Safety Research, Policing and Education Conference, 4-5 November 2002, Adelaide, SA.

Abstract

Despite the considerable evidence confirming the predominance of young males in traffic injury, gender has not been considered a significant factor in road safety education programs. This research examines the relationship between the perceptions of young males with motor vehicle offending histories concerning their masculinity and the relationship, if any between the enactment of these perceptions and their road use behaviour. Focusing on the specific behaviour of Opportunistic Vehicle Theft (Unlawful Use of a Motor Vehicle) the Theory of Planned Behaviour was used to examine personal attitudes, subjective norms and beliefs concerning how much control the participants believed they exercised over internal and external factors regarding the execution of a vehicle theft. Semi-structured interviews and focus groups were conducted with young men and associated agency staff through a range of youth justice agencies. Qualitative results from these interviews are presented.

This study is part of a PhD program developing a theory-driven intervention for young male offenders.

Impact and interest:

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ID Code: 10121
Item Type: Conference Paper
Additional Information: The contents of this conference can be freely accessed online via the conference’s web page (see hypertext link).
Additional URLs:
ISBN: 1876346469
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > CRIMINOLOGY (160200)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > COMMERCE MANAGEMENT TOURISM AND SERVICES (150000) > TRANSPORTATION AND FREIGHT SERVICES (150700) > Road Transportation and Freight Services (150703)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > OTHER STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (169900) > Gender Specific Studies (169901)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000)
Divisions: Current > Research Centres > Centre for Accident Research & Road Safety - Qld (CARRS-Q)
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2002 (please consult author)
Deposited On: 12 Oct 2007
Last Modified: 13 Nov 2009 16:02

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