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Alcohol-related expectancies are associated with the D2 dopamine receptor and GABAA receptor beta3 subunit genes

Young, Ross McD., Lawford, Bruce R., Feeney, Gerald F.X., Ritchie, Terry, & Noble, Ernest P. (2004) Alcohol-related expectancies are associated with the D2 dopamine receptor and GABAA receptor beta3 subunit genes. Psychiatry Research, 127(3), pp. 171-183.

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Abstract

Molecular genetic research has identified promising markers of alcohol dependence, including alleles of the D2 dopamine receptor (DRD2) and the GABAA receptor ¬3 subunit (GABRB3) genes. Whether such genetic risk manifests itself in stronger alcohol-related outcome expectancies, or in difficulty resisting alcohol, is unknown. In the present study, A1+ (A1A1 and A1A2 genotypes) and A1- (A2A2 genotype) alleles of the DRD2 and G1+ (G1G1 and G1 non-G1 genotypes) and G1- (non-G1 non-G1 genotype) alleles of the GABRB3 were determined in a group of 56 medically-ill patients diagnosed with alcohol dependence. Mood-related Alcohol Expectancy (AE) and Drinking Refusal Self-Efficacy (DRSE) were assessed using the Drinking Expectancy Profile (Young and Oei, 1996). Patients with the DRD2 A1+ allele, compared to those with the DRD2 A1- allele, reported lower DRSE in situations of social pressure (p=. 009). Similarly, lower DRSE was reported under social pressure by patients with the GABRB3 G1+ allele when compared to those with the GABRB3 G1- allele (p=.027). Patients with the GABRB3 G1+ allele also revealed reduced DRSE in situations characterized by negative affect than patients with the GABRB3 G1- alleles (p=. 037). Patients carrying the GABRB3 G1+ allele showed stronger AE relating to negative affective change (for example, increased depression) than their GABRB3 G1- counterparts (p=. 006). Biological influence in the development of some classes of cognitions is hypothesized. The clinical implications, particularly with regard to patient-treatment matching and the development of an integrated psychological and pharmacogenetic approach are discussed.

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ID Code: 1028
Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: Alcohol Expectancy, Self, Efficacy, Genetics, DRD2, GABRB3
DOI: 10.1016/j.psychres.2003.11.004
ISSN: 0165-1781
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > NEUROSCIENCES (110900) > Neurosciences not elsewhere classified (110999)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100) > Biological Psychology (Neuropsychology Psychopharmacology Physiological Psychology) (170101)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > MEDICAL PHYSIOLOGY (111600) > Cell Physiology (111601)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100) > Psychology not elsewhere classified (170199)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2004 Elsevier
Copyright Statement: Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.
Deposited On: 15 Apr 2005
Last Modified: 29 Feb 2012 23:04

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