QUT ePrints

Which presenteeism measures are more sensitive to depression and anxiety?

Sanderson, Kristy, Tilse, Elizabeth J., Nicholson, Jan, Oldenburg, Brian, & Graves, Nicholas (2007) Which presenteeism measures are more sensitive to depression and anxiety? Journal of Affective Disorders, 101(1-3), pp. 65-74.

View at publisher

Abstract

Lost productivity from attending work when unwell, or "presenteeism", is a largely hidden cost of mental disorders in the workplace. Sensitive measures are needed for clinical and policy applications, however there is no consensus on the optimal self-report measure to use. This paper examines the sensitivity of four alternative measures of presenteeism to depression and anxiety in an Australian employed cohort. METHODS: A prospective single-group study in ten call centres examined the association of presenteeism (presenteeism days, inefficiency days, Work Limitations Questionnaire, Stanford Presenteeism Scale) with Patient Health Questionnaire depression and anxiety syndromes. RESULTS: At baseline, all presenteeism measures were sensitive to differences between those with (N=69) and without (N=363) depression/anxiety. Only the Work Limitations Questionnaire consistently showed worse productivity as depression severity increased, and sensitivity to remission and onset of depression/anxiety over the 6-month follow-up (N=231). There was some evidence of individual depressive symptoms having a differential association with different types of job demands. LIMITATIONS: The study findings may not generalise to other occupational settings with different job demands. We were unable to compare responders with non-responders at baseline due to anonymity. CONCLUSIONS: In this community sample the Work Limitations Questionnaire offered additional sensitivity to depression severity, change over time, and individual symptoms. The comprehensive assessment of work performance offers significant advantages in demonstrating both the individual and economic burden of common mental disorders, and the potential gains from early intervention and treatment.

Impact and interest:

68 citations in Scopus
Search Google Scholar™
61 citations in Web of Science®

Citation countsare sourced monthly from Scopus and Web of Science® citation databases.

These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually different. Some works are not in either database and no count is displayed. Scopus includes citations from articles published in 1996 onwards, and Web of Science® generally from 1980 onwards.

Citations counts from the Google Scholar™ indexing service can be viewed at the linked Google Scholar™ search.

ID Code: 10701
Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: For more information, please refer to the journal’s website (see hypertext link) or contact the author.
Keywords: Depression, Anxiety, Presenteeism, Absenteeism, Employee
DOI: 10.1016/j.jad.2006.10.024
ISSN: 1573-2517
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > ECONOMICS (140000) > APPLIED ECONOMICS (140200) > Health Economics (140208)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety (111705)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Mental Health (111714)
Divisions: Current > Research Centres > Centre for Health Research
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2007 Elsevier
Deposited On: 14 Nov 2007
Last Modified: 29 Feb 2012 23:27

Export: EndNote | Dublin Core | BibTeX

Repository Staff Only: item control page