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The negative effects of task monotony and sensation seeking tendencies on sustained attention

Michael, Rebecca L. & Meuter, Renata (2007) The negative effects of task monotony and sensation seeking tendencies on sustained attention. In European Society for Cognitive Psychology (ESCoP) XV Conference, 29th August - 1st September 2007, Marseille, France. (Unpublished)

Abstract

Vigilance tasks are by their very nature monotonous, yet the effect of monotony is typically not explored in isolation. Often, task monotony is confounded with fatigue, and monotony of task and environment are not distinguished. We examined the differential effect of task monotony - independent of fatigue – on sustained attention using a short (<5min) vigilance task, and explored the role of sensation seeking tendencies, degree of extraversion and the propensity towards cognitive failures in moderating performance. Task monotony, and therefore also task demand, was manipulated by varying target stimulus probability (p(monotonous) = 0.11 vs, p(non-monotonous) = 0.50). Continuous responses were required to all but the target stimuli. Performance was significantly worse in the monotonous task. Importantly, high sensation seekers performed far worse on vigilance tasks characterised by low task demand. These findings have implications for real world tasks involving sustained attention, with task monotony affecting performance independently of fatigue.

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ID Code: 11073
Item Type: Conference Item (Poster)
Additional Information: Only the abstract is published in the Proceedings.
Additional URLs:
Keywords: monotony, hypovigilance, driver attention, sensation seeking
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100) > Sensory Processes Perception and Performance (170112)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > COMMERCE MANAGEMENT TOURISM AND SERVICES (150000) > TRANSPORTATION AND FREIGHT SERVICES (150700) > Road Transportation and Freight Services (150703)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Preventive Medicine (111716)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100) > Personality Abilities and Assessment (170109)
Divisions: Current > Research Centres > Centre for Accident Research & Road Safety - Qld (CARRS-Q)
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2007 (please consult author)
Deposited On: 30 Nov 2007
Last Modified: 09 Jun 2010 22:50

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