QUT ePrints

Effectiveness of a counseling intervention following a traumatic childbirth: A randomized controlled trial

Gamble, Jenny, Creedy, Debra, Moyle, Wendy, Webster, Joan, McAllister, Margaret, & Dickson, Paul (2005) Effectiveness of a counseling intervention following a traumatic childbirth: A randomized controlled trial. Birth, 32(1), pp. 11-19.

View at publisher

Abstract

Adverse childbirth experiences can evoke fear and overwhelming anxiety for some women and precipitate posttraumatic stress disorder. The objective of this study was to assess a midwife‐led brief counseling intervention for postpartum women at risk of developing psychological trauma symptoms. Method: Of 348 women screened for trauma symptoms, 103 met inclusion criteria and were randomized into an intervention (n = 50) or a control (n = 53) group. The intervention group received face‐to‐face counseling within 72 hours of birth and again via telephone at 4 to 6 weeks postpartum. Main outcome measures were posttraumatic stress symptoms, depression, self‐blame, and confidence about a future pregnancy. Results: At 3‐month follow‐up, intervention group women reported decreased trauma symptoms, low relative risk of depression, low relative risk of stress, and low feelings of self‐blame. Confidence about a future pregnancy was higher for these women than for control group women. Three intervention group women compared with 9 control group women met the diagnostic criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder at 3 months postpartum, but this result was not statistically significant. Discussion: A high prevalence of postpartum depression and trauma symptoms occurred after childbirth. Although most women improved over time, the intervention markedly affected participants' trajectory toward recovery compared with women who did not receive counseling. Conclusions: A brief, midwife‐led counseling intervention for women who report a distressing birth experience was effective in reducing symptoms of trauma, depression, stress, and feelings of self‐blame. The intervention is within the scope of midwifery practice, caused no harm to participants, was perceived as helpful, and enhanced women's confidence about a future pregnancy.

Impact and interest:

63 citations in Scopus
Search Google Scholar™
51 citations in Web of Science®

Citation countsare sourced monthly from Scopus and Web of Science® citation databases.

These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually different. Some works are not in either database and no count is displayed. Scopus includes citations from articles published in 1996 onwards, and Web of Science® generally from 1980 onwards.

Citations counts from the Google Scholar™ indexing service can be viewed at the linked Google Scholar™ search.

Full-text downloads:

1,160 since deposited on 11 Dec 2007
257 in the past twelve months

Full-text downloadsdisplays the total number of times this work’s files (e.g., a PDF) have been downloaded from QUT ePrints as well as the number of downloads in the previous 365 days. The count includes downloads for all files if a work has more than one.

ID Code: 11173
Item Type: Journal Article
DOI: 10.1111/j.0730-7659.2005.00340.x
ISSN: 0730-7659
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > NURSING (111000)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2005 Blackwell Publishing
Copyright Statement: The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com
Deposited On: 11 Dec 2007
Last Modified: 29 Feb 2012 23:11

Export: EndNote | Dublin Core | BibTeX

Repository Staff Only: item control page