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Community contingencies in the rehabilitation of drink driving offenders

Sheehan, Mary (2002) Community contingencies in the rehabilitation of drink driving offenders. In 37th Annual Conference of the Australian Psychological Society, 27 September - 10 October, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia.

Abstract

A core element in the control of drink driving is enabling offenders to separate drinking and driving. This paper will argue that successful rehabilitation requires treatment programs that include behaviour change strategies directed at both the personal and the community level. In this context the term "community" is relevant to the more broadly defined society in which drink driving occurs and to the personally defined community of friends, relatives and work colleagues who form the "experienced community" in which drink driving occurs. This paper presents the data and outcome findings from the evaluation of a large rehabilitation program that used cognitive behavioural strategies linked explicitly with community contingencies as the key intervention strategies. The program conducted over three years and involving over 800 participants produced significant reductions in recidivism in subsequent offending by a more severe, previously high recidivist group. It had no significant impact on first time offenders who completed it. This counter-intuitive finding of improved outcomes with the more established offender replicates recent international studies and is discussed as a possible result of increased effectiveness of community contingencies in the high risk-group.

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ID Code: 11186
Item Type: Conference Paper
Additional Information: Abstract published in Australian Journal of Psychology, (Taylor and Francis) 54 Supplement, p.55
Additional URLs:
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > SOCIAL WORK (160700) > Social Program Evaluation (160703)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > SOCIAL WORK (160700) > Counselling Welfare and Community Services (160702)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > COMMERCE MANAGEMENT TOURISM AND SERVICES (150000) > TRANSPORTATION AND FREIGHT SERVICES (150700) > Road Transportation and Freight Services (150703)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > CRIMINOLOGY (160200) > Criminology not elsewhere classified (160299)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100) > Health Clinical and Counselling Psychology (170106)
Divisions: Current > Research Centres > Centre for Accident Research & Road Safety - Qld (CARRS-Q)
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2002 (please consult author)
Deposited On: 19 Dec 2007
Last Modified: 09 Nov 2009 11:42

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