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Mechanisms of Change: The Role of Parliamentary Committees in Road Safety

Hansen, Robert & Bates, Lyndel J. (2004) Mechanisms of Change: The Role of Parliamentary Committees in Road Safety. In Road Safety Research, Policing and Education Conference 2004, 14-16 November 2004, Perth.

Abstract

Road safety problems are frequently complex and do not have a simple solution. Parliamentary road safety committees are an important mechanism for consulting with interest groups and the general public to achieve system-wide changes. Parliamentary committees are provided by their respective parliaments with significant inquiry powers to monitor, examine, investigate and report on issues with recommendations. The World Report on Road Traffic Injury Prevention released on World Health Day 2004 highlights the particular importance of parliamentary road safety committees in creating effective road safety policies. Knowledge about the role and functions of parliamentary committees and their contributions is often limited. This paper will discuss: the history, constitution and role of parliamentary road safety committees in Australia including their investigative, scrutiny and advocacy functions; their contribution to road safety interventions in Australia; and their specific roles as catalysts to foster accountability, reform and change. The paper will also provide information on how individuals and organisations can participate in the work of parliamentary committees for the advancement of road safety.

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ID Code: 11312
Item Type: Conference Paper
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION (160500) > Policy and Administration not elsewhere classified (160599)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > POLITICAL SCIENCE (160600)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION (160500)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > OTHER STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (169900)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION (160500) > Public Policy (160510)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > OTHER STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (169900) > Studies in Human Society not elsewhere classified (169999)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified (111799)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2004 (please consult author)
Deposited On: 07 Jan 2008
Last Modified: 01 Nov 2011 13:06

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