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Sense of Community and Place Attachment: The Natural Environment Plays a Vital Role in Developing a Sense of Community

Buys, Valmai & Buys, Laurie (2003) Sense of Community and Place Attachment: The Natural Environment Plays a Vital Role in Developing a Sense of Community. In Bradley, Rebecca, Lyddon, Jeff, & Buys, Laurie (Eds.) Social Change in the 21st Century, 21 November 2003, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane.

Abstract

Psychological sense of community (PSOC) is an intriguing construct that allows social scientists and psychologists to examine fundamental questions about how individuals are connected and committed to and influenced by the local residents who reside in a particular locality. In this study, initially exploration of sense of community within the chosen locality and population revealed that a ‘sense of community’ (SOC) not only included social bonding aspects but was also related to the bonds people developed with the natural environment. The data reveals that feelings of attachment to the natural landscape proved equally, if not more important than social bonds between residents in the development of a SOC. An extensive body of literature exists that has explored the nature and complexities of people’s emotional experience and relationships to place. The most common concepts are sense of place, place attachment, place identity and place dependence. While these concepts are broadly defined and discussed in theory, much research has concentrated on the notion of the home, limiting our understanding of this multi-faceted phenomenon. This paper intends to demonstrate the need to incorporate the full scale of human place related experiences that enable people to develop feelings of place attachment (PA) and incorporate these feelings into a cognitive structure representing their PSOC. 2

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ID Code: 115
Item Type: Conference Paper
ISBN: 0646431056
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > SOCIOLOGY (160800) > Urban Sociology and Community Studies (160810)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > BUILT ENVIRONMENT AND DESIGN (120000) > URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING (120500) > Land Use and Environmental Planning (120504)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > HUMAN GEOGRAPHY (160400) > Urban and Regional Studies (excl. Planning) (160404)
Divisions: Current > Research Centres > Centre for Social Change Research
Past > QUT Faculties & Divisions > QUT Carseldine - Humanities & Human Services
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2003 (The authors)
Deposited On: 30 Jun 2004
Last Modified: 29 Feb 2012 23:03

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