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Visibility of motion in infant vernier displays, using adult subjects

Carkeet, Andrew D., Levi, Dennis M., & Manny, Ruth E. (1996) Visibility of motion in infant vernier displays, using adult subjects. Ophthalmic and Physiological Optics, 16(3), pp. 239-242.

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Abstract

Motion is frequently incorporated in stimuli used for psychophysical testing of vernier acuity in infants and young children. In such stimuli, detection of the vernier offset is necessary in order to perceive the motion. Research described in this report tested whether the perception of a vernier offset is sufficient to signal the stimulus motion in adults. We measured how motion detectability changed as a function of vernier offset for two adult subjects, using a stimulus similar to that employed by other authors to measure vernier acuity in infants and children. Motion visibility varied with offset size, achieving a detectability of motion (d') of 0.95 (comparable to two-alternative forced-choice thresholds) at stimulus offsets of 16-19 s arc. In comparison to the motion, the stimulus offset itself was much easier to see, being detectable on 95-100% of trials with the smallest offset, 6.6 s arc. This distinction, between the visibility of motion and the visibility of the vernier offset itself, should be considered when interpreting vernier results using such displays, especially in infants and children for whom motion may be the attractive cue.

Impact and interest:

1 citations in Scopus
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2 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 11885
Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: For more information, please refer to the journal's website (see hypertext link) or contact the author.
DOI: 10.1046/j.1475-1313.1996.95000941.x
ISSN: 0275-5408
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > OPTOMETRY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY (111300)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > OPTOMETRY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY (111300) > Vision Science (111303)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > OPTOMETRY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY (111300) > Optical Technology (111302)
Divisions: Current > Research Centres > Centre for Health Research
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Copyright Owner: Copyright 1996 Blackwell Publishing
Deposited On: 14 Jan 2008
Last Modified: 22 Apr 2010 02:54

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