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Serial examination of the normal visual field using Octopus automated projection perimetry. Evidence for a learning effect

Wood, Joanne M., Wild, John M., Hussey, Michael K., & Crews, S. James (1987) Serial examination of the normal visual field using Octopus automated projection perimetry. Evidence for a learning effect. Acta Ophthalmologica, 65(3), pp. 326-333.

Abstract

The influence of prior perimetric experience on the magnitude of both differential sensitivity and the short and long term fluctuations remains unclear, and confounds accurate interpretation of visual field data obtained by computer-assisted perimetry. The purpose of the experiment was to identify and quantify any influence of training on the automated perimetric response. The full field of the right eye of 10 clinically normal, naive subjects was examined on 8 occasions with Octopus Program 21 (target size 3) on days 1-5 inclusive, 15, 16 and 44. Sensitivity increased with serial examination in 8 subjects. By dividing the field into zones, it was demonstrated that the learning effect was greatest in the superior field and for eccentricities beyond 30 degrees.

Impact and interest:

42 citations in Scopus
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65 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 11908
Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: For more information, please refer to the journal's website (see hypertext link) or contact the author.
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Keywords: differential light sensitivity, computer, assisted perimetry, learning effect
ISSN: 0001-639X
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > OPTOMETRY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY (111300)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > OPTOMETRY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY (111300) > Vision Science (111303)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > OPTOMETRY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY (111300) > Optical Technology (111302)
Divisions: Current > Research Centres > Centre for Health Research
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Copyright Owner: Copyright 1987 Blackwell Publishing
Deposited On: 14 Jan 2008
Last Modified: 22 Apr 2010 02:27

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