QUT ePrints

Harnessing the New Demographic: Adult and Community Learning in Older Populations. An Australian Focus with General Implications

Steinberg, Margaret A., Kearns, Peter B., Reghenzani, Denise M., & Peel, Nancye (2007) Harnessing the New Demographic: Adult and Community Learning in Older Populations. An Australian Focus with General Implications.

Abstract

From Introduction: 1. THE NEW DEMOGRAPHY: A DRIVER FOR RE-FOCUSING ON ADULT AND COMMUNITY LEARNING?

This is a unique moment in human history- we have never lived longer (Borowski et al., 2007, p1). It has even been said that of all the people over 65 who have ever lived, two-thirds are alive today (M. K. Dychtwald, 1997).

We argue that adult and community learning provides untold opportunities across a range of parameters and locations to support optimal ageing – for societies, for organisations, for communities, families and individuals. We also argue that understanding the new demography and the impact of ageing societies in other areas such as public health, including opportunity and direct costs, will broaden and enhance the perspective of policy makers and practitioners involved in adult and community learning.

While the focus of this paper is largely on the Australian experience, the paper also points to some general issues relevant to other countries where international exchanges of experience through the PASCAL Network would have considerable value. The paper ends with a set of key questions which it is hoped will stimulate discussion.

Impact and interest:

Citation countsare sourced monthly from Scopus and Web of Science® citation databases.

These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually different. Some works are not in either database and no count is displayed. Scopus includes citations from articles published in 1996 onwards, and Web of Science® generally from 1980 onwards.

Citations counts from the Google Scholar™ indexing service can be viewed at the linked Google Scholar™ search.

Full-text downloads:

407 since deposited on 29 Jan 2008
45 in the past twelve months

Full-text downloadsdisplays the total number of times this work’s files (e.g., a PDF) have been downloaded from QUT ePrints as well as the number of downloads in the previous 365 days. The count includes downloads for all files if a work has more than one.

ID Code: 12259
Item Type: Other
Keywords: ageing, adult learning, community learning, public policy, education, Australia
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > EDUCATION (130000) > OTHER EDUCATION (139900)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > DEMOGRAPHY (160300) > Demography not elsewhere classified (160399)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > SOCIOLOGY (160800) > Sociology of Education (160809)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > EDUCATION (130000) > SPECIALIST STUDIES IN EDUCATION (130300) > Specialist Studies in Education not elsewhere classified (130399)
Divisions: Current > Research Centres > Australian Centre for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Studies
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > QUT Business School
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2007 (The authors)
Deposited On: 29 Jan 2008
Last Modified: 25 Sep 2013 22:39

Export: EndNote | Dublin Core | BibTeX

Repository Staff Only: item control page