How do epistemological beliefs contribute to leadership styles and practices, and the challenges required to meet the needs of today's businesses?

Nailon, Di L., Dalglish, Carol L., Brownlee, Joanne M., & Hatcher, Caroline A. (2004) How do epistemological beliefs contribute to leadership styles and practices, and the challenges required to meet the needs of today's businesses? In 17th Annual Small Enterprise Association of Australia and New Zealand (SEAANZ) Conference, September 2004, Brisbane, Australia.

Abstract

The relationship between personal epistemological beliefs and behaviours of leaders will be undertaken as part of a doctoral research investigation. The research will also examine the changes that occur in leadership constructs and behaviour when epistemological beliefs are surfaced and explored with individuals. Leadership research and theory are briefly examined to identify a relevant leadership paradigm on which to begin the research. Similarly, epistemological beliefs and their role in leader values, decision-making and practice are discussed. Links between surfacing epistemological beliefs and leadership change are highlighted from the literature and offered as an imperative for investigation. Several postulates from the literature review are presented for consideration and as signposts for the doctoral study.

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ID Code: 1250
Item Type: Conference Paper
Refereed: Yes
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > QUT Business School
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Education
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2004 (please consult author)
Deposited On: 06 May 2005 00:00
Last Modified: 20 Mar 2013 01:03

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