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Ageing, learning and computer technology in Australia

Boulton-Lewis, Gillian M., Buys, Laurie, Lovie-Kitchin, Jan E., Barnett, Karen R., & David, Nikki (2007) Ageing, learning and computer technology in Australia. Educational Gerontology, 33(3), pp. 253-270.

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Abstract

Learning is an important aspect of active ageing, yet older people are not often included in discussions of the issue. Older people vary in their need, desire, and ability to learn, and this is evident in the context of technology. The focus of the data analysis for this paper was on determining the place of learning and technology in active ageing. The paper describes results from 2,645 respondents aged from 50 to 74þ years, in Australia, to a 178-item variable postal survey. The survey measured aspects of learning;, work; social, spiritual and emotional status; health; vision; home; life events; and demographics. There was also an open-ended question about being actively engaged in life. Ordinal regression analysis showed that interest in learning, keeping up to date, valuing communication, being younger, and being male are predictors of learning about technology. The results are at variance with an earlier analysis of our data which showed that women are generally more interested in learning. The open statements contained mentions of learning about technology for the purposes of communication, learning, family links, keeping up to date, enjoyment, staying mentally alert, and just using the computer. These results are discussed in terms of the subtle but important differences between needing and wanting to learn about technology and the opportunities for such learning by older people.

Impact and interest:

21 citations in Scopus
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15 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 12511
Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: For more information, please refer to the journal’s website (see hypertext link) or contact the author.
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Keywords: Active ageing, Computer technology usage, Quality of life
DOI: 10.1080/03601270601161249
ISSN: 1521-0472
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > OTHER STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (169900)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100) > Developmental Psychology and Ageing (170102)
Divisions: Current > Research Centres > Centre for Social Change Research
Past > QUT Faculties & Divisions > QUT Carseldine - Humanities & Human Services
Current > Schools > School of Optometry & Vision Science
Past > Schools > School of Design
Current > Schools > School of Psychology & Counselling
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2007 Taylor & Francis
Deposited On: 18 Feb 2008
Last Modified: 29 Feb 2012 23:35

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