QUT ePrints

Moving towards Midlife Care as Negotiated Family Business: accounts of people with intellectual disabilities and their families. "Just Getting along with their Lives Together"

Knox, Marie F. & Bigby, Christine (2007) Moving towards Midlife Care as Negotiated Family Business: accounts of people with intellectual disabilities and their families. "Just Getting along with their Lives Together". International Journal of Disability, Development and Education, 54(3), pp. 287-304.

View at publisher

Abstract

This study explores meanings of family care held by seven families that include a middle-aged adult with intellectually disability. In-depth interviews were conducted with members of each family- the person with intellectual disability, parents, siblings and sibling spouses.

Participants described care as simply getting on with their lives, as Family Business, characterised by the conduct of well-understood tasks and routines. As such, all, including the person with intellectually disability, performed roles critical to the well-being of each other and the family as a whole. Family Business was underpinned by negotiated albeit often implicit rules that reflected family values and were amenable to changes in circumstances throughout the lifecycle. Future planning was perceived as a sensitive whole family issue. Interdependence among members was key to retaining family independence from formal services that were regarded as a "top up". Suggested is the importance of services adopting a relational approach to understanding family care and supporting future planning for middle aged people with intellectual disabilities, rather than simply focussing on "older carers".

Impact and interest:

8 citations in Scopus
Search Google Scholar™

Citation countsare sourced monthly from Scopus and Web of Science® citation databases.

These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually different. Some works are not in either database and no count is displayed. Scopus includes citations from articles published in 1996 onwards, and Web of Science® generally from 1980 onwards.

Citations counts from the Google Scholar™ indexing service can be viewed at the linked Google Scholar™ search.

ID Code: 13206
Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: For more information, please refer to the journal's website (see hypertext link) or contact the author.
Keywords: intellectual disability, family, ageing, qualitative research
DOI: 10.1080/10349120701488749
ISSN: 1465-346X
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > SOCIOLOGY (160800) > Social Change (160805)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION (160500) > Social Policy (160512)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION (160500) > Social Policy (160512)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > SOCIAL WORK (160700) > Social Work not elsewhere classified (160799)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > SOCIOLOGY (160800) > Applied Sociology Program Evaluation and Social Impact Assessment (160801)
Divisions: Current > Research Centres > Centre for Social Change Research
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2007 Taylor & Francis
Copyright Statement: First published in International Journal of Disability, Development and Education 54(3):pp. 287-304.
Deposited On: 31 Mar 2008
Last Modified: 29 Feb 2012 23:37

Export: EndNote | Dublin Core | BibTeX

Repository Staff Only: item control page