QUT ePrints

Driver self-reported fleet safety characteristics: A study predicting organisational risk

Rowland, Bevan D., Davey, Jeremy D., Freeman, James E., & Wishart, Darren E. (2008) Driver self-reported fleet safety characteristics: A study predicting organisational risk. In 9th World Conference on Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion, 15-18 March 2008, Merida, Mexico. (Unpublished)

Abstract

Objective. Occupational fleet safety is an emerging issue for Australian and overseas organisations. Research has shown that road crashes are the most common cause of work-related fatalities, injuries and absences from work. Study objectives were to identify driver characteristics (particularly behaviour and attitude) which pose potential risks to work-related driving safety within the organisation. Survey is used as a baseline to assist targeted intervention development Material and methods. A questionnaire survey was administered as part of a baseline assessment to a large Australian fleet. A total of 4195 individuals volunteered to participate in the study and were located throughout Australia in both urban and rural areas. The survey utilised the Manchester Driver Behaviour Questionnaire (DBQ), Driver Attitude Questionnaire (DAQ), Safety Climate Questionnaire (SCQ) and Sensation Seeking Questionnaire (SSQ). Results. Within the study drivers reported engaging in speeding behaviours (univariate analysis) and believed speeding was more acceptable compared to drink driving, following too closely or performing risky overtaking manoeuvres. However, multivariate analysis determined factors associated with self-reported crash involvement revealed that increased work pressure and driving errors were predictive of crash risk, even after controlling for exposure to the road. Not surprisingly, young male drivers tended to be higher sensation seekers compared to older drivers. In addition, sensation seeking was strongly related to unsafe driving practices as identified by the DBQ and DAQ. Discussion and conclusions. Vehicle drivers who feel more time pressures also have poorer safety attitudes and behaviours. Self-reported exceeding of speed limits and an attitude that this practice is acceptable behaviour was identified as the most common aberrant driving practice and is a risk which should be addressed.

Impact and interest:

Citation countsare sourced monthly from Scopus and Web of Science® citation databases.

These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually different. Some works are not in either database and no count is displayed. Scopus includes citations from articles published in 1996 onwards, and Web of Science® generally from 1980 onwards.

Citations counts from the Google Scholar™ indexing service can be viewed at the linked Google Scholar™ search.

Full-text downloads:

220 since deposited on 08 Apr 2008
25 in the past twelve months

Full-text downloadsdisplays the total number of times this work’s files (e.g., a PDF) have been downloaded from QUT ePrints as well as the number of downloads in the previous 365 days. The count includes downloads for all files if a work has more than one.

ID Code: 13238
Item Type: Conference Paper
Additional Information: Only the abstract was published in Abstracts of the 9th World Conference on Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion (ISBN - 9789709874747). No paper was prepared.
Additional URLs:
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Preventive Medicine (111716)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > COMMERCE MANAGEMENT TOURISM AND SERVICES (150000) > TRANSPORTATION AND FREIGHT SERVICES (150700) > Road Transportation and Freight Services (150703)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety (111705)
Divisions: Current > Research Centres > Centre for Accident Research & Road Safety - Qld (CARRS-Q)
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2008 (The authors)
Deposited On: 08 Apr 2008
Last Modified: 09 Jun 2010 22:57

Export: EndNote | Dublin Core | BibTeX

Repository Staff Only: item control page