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Selected adsorbent materials for oil-spill cleanup – a Thermoanalytical study

Frost, Ray L., Carmody, Onuma, Kokot, Serge, & Xi, Yunfei (2008) Selected adsorbent materials for oil-spill cleanup – a Thermoanalytical study. Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry, 91(3), pp. 809-816.

Abstract

Thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry have been applied to determine the adsorption of oil on selected adsorbates: sand, organoclay and raw cotton. Thermal analysis provides evidence for the interaction and physical adsorption of the diesel oil on the adsorbates. Sand adsorbed diesel to around 33 % by mass through weak physical interactions and appeared to fractionate the diesel components. The organoclays more strongly adsorbed the diesel as evidenced by higher thermal decomposition temperatures. Differential scanning calorimetry shows a strong interaction between the organoclay and the diesel oil. The organo-clay adsorbed around three times its own mass of diesel. Diesel is effectively adsorbed on organoclay through adsorption and partitioning and is not removed from the organoclay until significantly higher temperatures. Cotton displayed a very high adsorption/absorption capacity. A shift in the peak at 110 degrees Celsius (compared with pure diesel at 90 degrees Celsius) suggests an interaction between the diesel compounds and the cotton fibres as diesel is being retained at higher temperatures and more energy is required to evaporate the diesel. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to determine the strength of the diesel adsorption on the sand, organoclay and cotton. The use of adsorbent materials to adsorb oil from oil spills is of great significance in modern society. One method of proving the effectiveness of an adsorbent material is through thermoanalytical techniques.

Impact and interest:

21 citations in Scopus
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18 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 13295
Item Type: Journal Article
Additional URLs:
Keywords: Hydrocarbons, adsorption, sorbents, cotton, organo, clays, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry
ISSN: 1388-6150
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > CHEMICAL SCIENCE (030000) > PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY (INCL. STRUCTURAL) (030600)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > CHEMICAL SCIENCE (030000) > PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY (INCL. STRUCTURAL) (030600) > Chemical Thermodynamics and Energetics (030602)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > CHEMICAL SCIENCE (030000) > PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY (INCL. STRUCTURAL) (030600) > Colloid and Surface Chemistry (030603)
Divisions: Past > QUT Faculties & Divisions > Faculty of Science and Technology
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2008 Springer
Copyright Statement: The original publication is available at SpringerLink http://www.springerlink.com
Deposited On: 14 Apr 2008
Last Modified: 29 Feb 2012 23:46

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