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Informed Consent and Human Rights: Some Regulatory Challenges of Xenotransplantation

Cook, Peta S. (2007) Informed Consent and Human Rights: Some Regulatory Challenges of Xenotransplantation. Social Alternatives, 26(4), pp. 29-34.

Abstract

In contemporary Western society, technoscience plays an important and influential role. This is not to say that it always brings positive results, as negative outcomes can and do result. The rate of technoscientific change can also stimulate considerable ethical questions and moral dilemmas about the direction of society, and social change in general. In this article, I explore how one particular technoscientific development, xenotransplantation (animal-to-human transplantation), poses significant and often conflicting challenges to traditional conceptions and understandings of informed consent and human rights. While the main focus is placed on Australia, this article also points to the difficulties of State sovereignty in a globalised world. That is to say, the negative consequences of xenotransplantation are not necessarily restricted to geopolitical boundaries, as the decision of one to proceed could potentially affect the many.

Impact and interest:

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ID Code: 13371
Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: For more information, please refer to the journal's website (see hypertext link) or contact the author.
Additional URLs:
Keywords: human rights, zoonosis, xenotransplantation, informed consent, globalisation and health, xenotourism, regulation, policy
ISSN: 0155-0306
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGIOUS STUDIES (220000) > APPLIED ETHICS (220100) > Human Rights and Justice Issues (220104)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION (160500) > Social Policy (160512)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > SOCIOLOGY (160800)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES (060000) > MICROBIOLOGY (060500) > Infectious Agents (060502)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > SOCIOLOGY (160800) > Sociology and Social Studies of Science and Technology (160808)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION (160500) > Research Science and Technology Policy (160511)
Divisions: Current > Research Centres > Centre for Social Change Research
Past > QUT Faculties & Divisions > QUT Carseldine - Humanities & Human Services
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2007 Social Alternatives
Deposited On: 28 Apr 2008
Last Modified: 15 Jan 2009 18:15

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