Host Species-Specific Metabolic Fingerprint Database for Enterococci and Escherichia coli and Its Application To Identify Sources of Fecal Contamination in Surface Waters

Ahmed, Warish, Neller, Ron, & Katouli, Mohammad (2005) Host Species-Specific Metabolic Fingerprint Database for Enterococci and Escherichia coli and Its Application To Identify Sources of Fecal Contamination in Surface Waters. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 71(8), pp. 4461-4468.

View at publisher

Abstract

A metabolic fingerprint database of enterococci and Escherichia coli from 10 host groups of animals was developed to trace the sources of fecal contamination in surface waters. In all, 526 biochemical phenotypes (BPTs) of enterococci and 530 E. coli BPTs were obtained from 4,057 enterococci and 3,728 E. coli isolates tested. Of these, 231 Enterococcus BPTs and 257 E. coli BPTs were found in multiple host groups. The remaining 295 Enterococcus BPTs and 273 E. coli BPTs were unique to individual host groups. The database was used to trace the sources of fecal contamination in a local creek. The mean diversities (Di) of enterococci (Di = 0.76 +/- 0.05) and E. coli (Di = 0.88 +/- 0.04) were high (maximum 1) in water samples, indicating diverse sources of fecal contamination. Overall, 71% of BPTs of enterococci and 67% of E. coli BPTs from water samples were identified as human and animal sources. Altogether, 248 Enterococcus BPTs and 282 E. coli BPTs were found in water samples. Among enterococci, 26 (10%) BPTs were identical to those of humans and 152 BPTs (61%) were identical to those of animals (animal BPTs). Among E. coli isolates, 36 (13%) BPTs were identical to those of humans and 151 (54%) BPTs were identical to those of animals. Of the animal BPTs, 101 (66%) Enterococcus BPTs and 93 (62%) E. coli BPTs were also unique to individual animal groups. On the basis of these unique Enterococcus BPTs, chickens contributed 14% of contamination, followed by humans (10%), dogs (7%), and horses (6%). For E. coli, humans contributed 13% of contamination, followed by ducks (9%), cattle (7%), and chickens (6%). The developed metabolic fingerprint database was able to distinguish between human and animal sources as well as among animal species in the studied catchment.

Impact and interest:

47 citations in Scopus
Search Google Scholar™
44 citations in Web of Science®

Citation counts are sourced monthly from Scopus and Web of Science® citation databases.

These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually different. Some works are not in either database and no count is displayed. Scopus includes citations from articles published in 1996 onwards, and Web of Science® generally from 1980 onwards.

Citations counts from the Google Scholar™ indexing service can be viewed at the linked Google Scholar™ search.

Full-text downloads:

164 since deposited on 02 May 2008
8 in the past twelve months

Full-text downloads displays the total number of times this work’s files (e.g., a PDF) have been downloaded from QUT ePrints as well as the number of downloads in the previous 365 days. The count includes downloads for all files if a work has more than one.

ID Code: 13458
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
DOI: 10.1128/AEM.71.8.4461-4468.2005
ISSN: 0099-2240
Divisions: Past > QUT Faculties & Divisions > Faculty of Built Environment and Engineering
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2005 American Society for Microbiology
Copyright Statement: Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.
Deposited On: 02 May 2008 00:00
Last Modified: 10 Aug 2011 16:28

Export: EndNote | Dublin Core | BibTeX

Repository Staff Only: item control page