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Multiple regions in dengue virus capsid protein contribute to nuclear localization during virus infection

Sangiambut, Sutha, Keelapang, Poonsook, Aaskov, John G., Puttikhunt, Chunya, Kasinrerk, Watchara, Malasit, Prida, & Sittisombut, Nopporn (2008) Multiple regions in dengue virus capsid protein contribute to nuclear localization during virus infection. Journal of General Virology, 89(Pt 5), pp. 1254-1264.

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Abstract

During infection, the capsid (C) protein of many flaviviruses localizes to the nuclei and nucleoli of several infected cell lines; the underlying basis and significance of C protein nuclear localization remain poorly understood. In this study, double alanine-substitution mutations were introduced into three previously proposed nuclear-localization signals (at positions 6-9, 73-76 and 85-100) of dengue virus C protein, and four viable mutants, c(K6A,K7A), c(K73A,K74A), c(R85A,K86A) and c(R97A,R98A), were generated in a mosquito cell line in which C protein nuclear localization was rarely observed. Indirect immunofluorescence analysis revealed that, whilst C protein was present in the nuclei of PS and Vero cells throughout infection with a dengue serotype 2 parent virus, the substitution mutations in c(K73A,K74A) and c(R85A,K86A) resulted in an elimination of nuclear localization in PS cells and marked reduction in Vero cells. Mutants c(K6A,K7A) and c(R97A,R98A) exhibited reduced nuclear localization at the late period of infection in PS cells only. All four mutants displayed reduced replication in PS, Vero and C6/36 cells, but there was a lack of correlation between nuclear localization and viral growth properties. Distinct dibasic residues within dengue virus C protein, many of which were located on the solvent-exposed side of the C protein homodimer, contribute to its ability to localize to nuclei during virus infection.

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26 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 13700
Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: For more information, please refer to the journal's website (see hypertext link) or contact the author.
DOI: 10.1099/vir.0.83264-0
ISSN: 0022-1317
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES (060000) > MICROBIOLOGY (060500) > Infectious Agents (060502)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES (060000) > MICROBIOLOGY (060500) > Virology (060506)
Divisions: Past > QUT Faculties & Divisions > Faculty of Science and Technology
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2008 Society for General Microbiology
Deposited On: 10 Jun 2008
Last Modified: 29 Feb 2012 23:59

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