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Predictors of intention to exercise to reduce stroke risk among people at risk of stroke : an application of an extended Health Belief Model

Sullivan, Karen A., White, Katherine M., Young, Ross McD., & Scott, Clinton J. (2008) Predictors of intention to exercise to reduce stroke risk among people at risk of stroke : an application of an extended Health Belief Model. Rehabilitation Psychology, 53(4), pp. 505-512.

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Abstract

Purpose: To examine predictors of intention to reduce stroke risk in a sample of at risk individuals through the application of an expanded Health Belief Model (HBM). Research Method: Predictors included stroke knowledge, demographic variables, beliefs about stroke derived from the HBM, and measures of subjective norm and self-efficacy. The dependent variable was intention to reduce stroke risk. Two hundred and seventy six surveys were distributed to participants at three site types: bowling clubs, senior citizens clubs and retirement villages. One hundred and one surveys were returned yielding a response rate of 37%, and data from 76 of these respondents was used for further analysis. Results: With regard to exercise intention, a pattern of significant correlations between HBM variables, subjective norm and self-efficacy was observed. Results of multiple hierarchical regression analyses showed that perceived benefits of undertaking exercise, and self-efficacy in relation exercise were the two most important determinants of exercise intentions. Conclusions: Findings suggest that health beliefs may play an important role in stroke prevention. Practice Implications: Stroke education and prevention programs that selectively target beliefs about the perceived benefits of, and self-efficacy related to, exercise to reduce stroke risk may prove most efficacious.

Impact and interest:

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ID Code: 13938
Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: Karen Sullivan, stroke, cerebrovascular accident, Health Belief Model, stroke knowledge, stroke prevention
ISSN: 0090-5550
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100) > Biological Psychology (Neuropsychology Psychopharmacology Physiological Psychology) (170101)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100) > Health Clinical and Counselling Psychology (170106)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Psychology & Counselling
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2008 American Psychological Association
Copyright Statement: This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record.
Deposited On: 02 Jul 2008
Last Modified: 29 Feb 2012 23:44

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