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The Indigenous Experience of Australian Civil Society: Making Sense of Historic and Contemporary Institutions

Hart, Victor G., Thompson, Lester J., & Stedman, Terry (2008) The Indigenous Experience of Australian Civil Society: Making Sense of Historic and Contemporary Institutions. Social Alternatives, 27(1), pp. 52-57.

Abstract

In order to protect future citizens from tyranny and to distribute the rewards of a perceived modern civilization, the architects of the Australian constitution sought to institutionalize such principles as liberty, individual rights and democracy. Once established, this Constitution also institutionalized a set of racist principles that have an ongoing impact on civil society in the 21st century. After progressing from its specific illiberal references to race, the Constitution permitted the historic development of government policy based upon certain European liberal ideological values which construct liberty as a white, free-market concept. Indigenous economic priorities have subsequently been perceived as values that must be deleted from society, and Australian policy objectives have been focused by this aim. This paper examines this historically grounded value system and its impact on certain contemporary policy directions. It considers the implications for Indigenous citizenship in Australia and implications for Indigenous citizens.

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ID Code: 13942
Item Type: Journal Article
Additional URLs:
Keywords: indigenous, policy, government, social policy, colonialism
ISSN: 0155-0306
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION (160500) > Public Policy (160510)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > POLITICAL SCIENCE (160600) > Australian Government and Politics (160601)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > POLITICAL SCIENCE (160600)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > OTHER STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (169900) > Studies in Human Society not elsewhere classified (169999)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > LAW AND LEGAL STUDIES (180000) > LAW (180100) > Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Law (180101)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > LAW AND LEGAL STUDIES (180000) > LAW (180100)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > LANGUAGES COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE (200000) > CULTURAL STUDIES (200200) > Postcolonial Studies (200211)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2008 University of Queensland
Copyright Statement: Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.
Deposited On: 02 Jul 2008
Last Modified: 29 Feb 2012 23:46

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