QUT ePrints

The Independent Contribution of Neighborhood Disadvantage and Individual-Level Socioeconomic Position to Self-Reported Oral Health: A Multilevel Analysis

Turrell, Gavin, Sanders, Anne E., Slade, Gary D., Spencer, A. John, & Marcenes, Wagner (2007) The Independent Contribution of Neighborhood Disadvantage and Individual-Level Socioeconomic Position to Self-Reported Oral Health: A Multilevel Analysis. Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, 35(3), pp. 195-206.

View at publisher

Abstract

Objectives: To examine the association between neighborhood disadvantage and individual-level socioeconomic position (SEP) and self-reported oral health.

Methods: A population-based cross-sectional study conducted in 2003 among males and females aged 43-57 years. The sample comprised 2915 individuals and 60 neighborhoods and was selected using a stratified two-stage cluster design. Data were collected using a mail survey (69.4% response rate). Neighborhood disadvantage was measured using a census based composite index, and individual-level SEP was measured using education and household income. Oral health was indicated by self-reports of the impact of oral conditions on quality of life (0=none or minor, 1=severe), self-rated oral health (0=excellent-good, 1=fair/poor) and missing teeth (measured as a quantitative outcome). Data were analyzed using multilevel modeling.

Results: After adjusting for age, sex, education, and household income, residents of socioeconomically disadvantaged neighborhoods were significantly more likely than those in more advantaged neighborhoods to indicate negative impacts of oral conditions on quality of life, to assess their oral health as fair or poor, and to report greater tooth loss. In addition, respondents with low levels of education and those from a low income household reported poorer oral health for each outcome independent of neighborhood disadvantage.

Conclusions: The socioeconomic characteristics of neighborhoods are important for oral health over-and-above the socioeconomic characteristics of the people living in those neighborhoods. Policies and interventions to improve population oral health should be directed at the social, physical and infrastructural characteristics of places as well as individuals (i.e. the traditional target of intervention efforts).

Impact and interest:

36 citations in Scopus
Search Google Scholar™
35 citations in Web of Science®

Citation countsare sourced monthly from Scopus and Web of Science® citation databases.

These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually different. Some works are not in either database and no count is displayed. Scopus includes citations from articles published in 1996 onwards, and Web of Science® generally from 1980 onwards.

Citations counts from the Google Scholar™ indexing service can be viewed at the linked Google Scholar™ search.

Full-text downloads:

271 since deposited on 09 Jul 2008
44 in the past twelve months

Full-text downloadsdisplays the total number of times this work’s files (e.g., a PDF) have been downloaded from QUT ePrints as well as the number of downloads in the previous 365 days. The count includes downloads for all files if a work has more than one.

ID Code: 14002
Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: Australia, health inequalities, multilevel analysis, neighborhoods, oral health, socioeconomic factors
DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0528.2006.00311.x
ISSN: 0301-5661
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Epidemiology (111706)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Preventive Medicine (111716)
Divisions: Current > Research Centres > Centre for Health Research
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2007 Blackwell Publishing
Copyright Statement: The definitive version is available at the publisher's website.
Deposited On: 09 Jul 2008
Last Modified: 29 Feb 2012 23:38

Export: EndNote | Dublin Core | BibTeX

Repository Staff Only: item control page