QUT ePrints

Suspension testing of 3 heavy vehicles – methodology and preliminary frequency analysis. Report

Davis, Lloyd E. & Bunker, Jonathan M. (2008) Suspension testing of 3 heavy vehicles – methodology and preliminary frequency analysis. Report. State of Queensland (Department of Main Roads) & Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland.

Abstract

Three air-sprung heavy vehicles (HVs) were instrumented and tested on typical suburban and highway road sections at typical operational speeds. The vehicles used were a tri-axle semi-trailer towed with a prime mover, an interstate coach with 3 axles and a school bus with 2 axles. The air springs (air bags) of the axle/axle group of interest were configured such that they could be connected using either standard longitudinal air lines or an innovative suspension system comprising larger-than-standard longitudinal air lines. Data for dynamic forces on axles, wheels and chassis were gathered for the purposes of:  analysis of the relative performance of the HVs for the two sizes of air lines;  informing the QUT/Main Roads project Heavy vehicle suspensions – testing and analysis; and  providing a reference source for future projects. This reports sets down the methodology and preliminary results of the testing carried out. Accordingly, Fast-Fourier plots are provided to show indicative frequency spectra for HV axles, wheel forces and air springs during typical use. The results are documented in Appendices 3 to 5. There appears to be little or no correlation between dynamic forces in the air springs and the wheel forces in the HVs tested. Axle-hop at frequencies between 10-15 Hz predominated for unsprung masses in the HV suspensions tested. Air-spring forces are present in the sub-1.0 Hz to approximately 2 Hz frequency range. With the qualification that only one set of data from each test speed is presented herein, in general, the peaks in the frequency spectra of the body-bounce forces and wheel forces were reduced for the tests with the larger longitudinal air lines. More research needs to be done on the load sharing mechanisms between axles on air-sprung HVs. In particular, how and whether improved load sharing can be effected and whether better load sharing between axles will reduce dynamic wheel and chassis forces. This last point, in particular, in relation to the varied dynamic measures used by the HV testing community to compare different suspension types.

Impact and interest:

Citation countsare sourced monthly from Scopus and Web of Science® citation databases.

These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually different. Some works are not in either database and no count is displayed. Scopus includes citations from articles published in 1996 onwards, and Web of Science® generally from 1980 onwards.

Citations counts from the Google Scholar™ indexing service can be viewed at the linked Google Scholar™ search.

Full-text downloads:

643 since deposited on 14 Jul 2008
110 in the past twelve months

Full-text downloadsdisplays the total number of times this work’s files (e.g., a PDF) have been downloaded from QUT ePrints as well as the number of downloads in the previous 365 days. The count includes downloads for all files if a work has more than one.

ID Code: 14052
Item Type: Book
Keywords: dynamic suspension analysis, heavy vehicle, dynamic loads, wheel loads, frequency analysis, suspension forces, wheel forces, air suspension
ISBN: 9781920719098
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > INFORMATION AND COMPUTING SCIENCES (080000) > INFORMATION SYSTEMS (080600) > Information Systems Theory (080611)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > ENGINEERING (090000) > MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (091300) > Mechanical Engineering not elsewhere classified (091399)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > TECHNOLOGY (100000)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > ENGINEERING (090000) > MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (091300)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > ENGINEERING (090000) > AUTOMOTIVE ENGINEERING (090200)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > ENGINEERING (090000) > ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING (090600)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > ENGINEERING (090000) > ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING (090600) > Electrical and Electronic Engineering not elsewhere classified (090699)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > ENGINEERING (090000) > ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING (090600) > Power and Energy Systems Engineering (excl. Renewable Power) (090607)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > ENGINEERING (090000) > AUTOMOTIVE ENGINEERING (090200) > Automotive Engineering not elsewhere classified (090299)
Divisions: Past > QUT Faculties & Divisions > Faculty of Built Environment and Engineering
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2008 State of Queensland (Department of Main Roads) & Queensland University of Technology
Copyright Statement: The authors have exerted their moral rights and rights under the Copyright Act.
Deposited On: 14 Jul 2008
Last Modified: 09 Jun 2010 23:01

Export: EndNote | Dublin Core | BibTeX

Repository Staff Only: item control page