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The influence of lipid-extraction method on the stiffness of articular cartilage

Gudimetla, Prasad V., Crawford, Ross W., & Oloyede, Adekunle (2007) The influence of lipid-extraction method on the stiffness of articular cartilage. Clinical Biomechanics, 22(8), pp. 924-931.

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Abstract

Background One of the known characteristics of osteoarthritis is the loss of articular cartilage lipids. Therefore, it is important to study how lipids influence the functions of the tissue. This can only be done successfully by indirect analysis involving the extraction of lipids and subsequent assessment of the delipidized matrix. Therefore, for accuracy, the procedure for lipid extraction must not induce any other modification in the samples to be assessed. Hence, we compare three rinsing agents and methods in this study.

Methods Normal and delipidized articular cartilage samples were tested under compressive loading at 4 loading velocities to obtain and compare their stiffness values.

Findings Chloroform rinsing resulted in a 45% decrease in the stiffness of cartilage at low strain-rates (10−2/s and 10−1/s) on average with a corresponding increase of 55% at higher strain-rate of 10/s relative to the normal. Ethanol rinsed cartilage exhibited a corresponding decrease of 40% at the low strain-rates while exhibiting an increase of about 20% at the highest loading rates. Propylene glycol rinsing resulted in a decrease of approximately 20% in stiffness, while an increase of up to 5% at high rates of loading.

Interpretation

• The loss of lipids modifies the stiffness of articular cartilage at all loading rates.

• The relatively larger deviation of the stiffness of chloroform rinsed samples relative to the normal is probably a consequence of the drying process involved in rinsing protocol.

• It is probable that the results of milder rinsing agents, used without vacuum drying are more reflective of physiological delipidization effects on the tissue. Consequently, we recommend propylene glycol and its associated protocol for extracting lipids from articular cartilage.

Impact and interest:

4 citations in Scopus
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3 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 14889
Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: Articular cartilage, Lipids, Rinsing methods, Propylene glycol, Stiffness
DOI: 10.1016/j.clinbiomech.2007.05.009
ISSN: 0268-0033
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > MEDICAL BIOCHEMISTRY AND METABOLOMICS (110100) > Medical Biochemistry - Lipids (110104)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > CLINICAL SCIENCES (110300) > Orthopaedics (110314)
Divisions: Past > QUT Faculties & Divisions > Faculty of Built Environment and Engineering
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Past > Schools > School of Engineering Systems
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2007 Elsevier
Copyright Statement: Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.
Deposited On: 17 Sep 2008
Last Modified: 29 Feb 2012 23:31

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