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Developing a Fighting Chance in the War for Talent: The Formation and Change of Graduates' Psychological Contracts

Puchala, Naomi M. (2008) Developing a Fighting Chance in the War for Talent: The Formation and Change of Graduates' Psychological Contracts. In Brown, Kerry A., Mandell, Myrna, Furneaux, Craig W., Beach, Sandra, & , (Eds.) Contemporary Issues in Public Management : The Twelfth Annual Conference of the International Research Society for Public Management (IRSPM XII), 26 – 28 March, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland.

Abstract

The dynamics of the labour market are changing with the balance of power within the employment relationship swinging towards employees. Recruitment is now a seller's market (Herriot, 1988) particularly among mobile, highly skilled workers (Rousseau & Shperling, 2003). The changing labour market has been the backdrop against which a refocusing on the topic of employee-employer relationships by both researchers and practitioners has occurred (Sparrow, 1996; Tekleab, Takeuchi, & Taylor, 2005). This focus is purposed on building a better understanding of such relationships in order to more effectively attract and retain talented staff (Rousseau & Shperling, 2003). The new workforce era has been described as the 'war for talent' and this phrase depicts some of focus, and perhaps even aggression, with which organisations are pursuing new recruits and making efforts to retain them. Workforce planning has become a strategic imperative for organisations with strategies devised to attract and retain staff across the different generations. When it comes to attracting and retaining the younger generation, many organisations have either begun, or expanded existing, graduate programs in an attempt to secure employees. This is particularly the case in industries where there are critical labour shortages. Whilst graduate recruitment has become an important workforce attraction strategy for many organisations, retention may be compromised by the growing tension in workplaces between the different generations of employees. Notable differences have been espoused between the generations in terms of how they see the world and how they prefer to work (e.g. Sheahan, 2005). A topic prolific in popular literature over the recent years has been the behaviours and preferences of Generation Y in the workplace. The popular literature appears to have taken a very negative spin on these supposed differences and has labelled Generation Y members as uncommitted, flaky, self-absorbed and disrespectful. The academic literature dismisses the popular culture literature as inaccurate, empirically unfounded and caricature-like (e.g. Jorgensen, 2003; Taylor, 2005) although, due to a lack of work in the field, it offers little alternative perspective.

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ID Code: 15325
Item Type: Conference Paper
Additional URLs:
Keywords: Psychological Contract, Graduates, Human Resource Management, Recruitment
ISBN: 1741072158
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > COMMERCE MANAGEMENT TOURISM AND SERVICES (150000) > BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT (150300) > Human Resources Management (150305)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > COMMERCE MANAGEMENT TOURISM AND SERVICES (150000) > BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT (150300) > Business and Management not elsewhere classified (150399)
Divisions: Current > Research Centres > Australian Centre for Business Research
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > QUT Business School
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2008 (please consult author)
Deposited On: 27 Oct 2008
Last Modified: 05 Jan 2011 23:38

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