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Communication prompts donation : exploring the beliefs underlying registration and discussion of the organ donation decision

Hyde, Melissa K. & White, Katherine M. (2009) Communication prompts donation : exploring the beliefs underlying registration and discussion of the organ donation decision. British Journal of Health Psychology, 14(3), pp. 423-435.

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Abstract

Objectives: To use a Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) framework to explore the beliefs underlying communication of the donation decision for people who had not previously registered their consent on a donor register or discussed their decision with significant others. Design: Initially, a focus group study elicited the common TPB (behavioural, normative, control) beliefs about registering and discussing the organ donation decision. The main study assessed the important TPB belief predictors of intentions to register and discuss the donation decision. Method: University students and community members from Queensland, Australia (N = 123) completed items assessing their intentions and the TPB behavioural, normative, and control beliefs for registering and discussing their donation decision.----- Results: Structural Equation Modelling analyses revealed significant paths between people’s intentions to register their donation decisions and underlying behavioural (e.g. enabling efficient donation procedures), normative (e.g. friends, doctors/medical professionals), and control (e.g. lack of motivation, knowing details about transplant recipients) beliefs (R2 = .30). There were also significant paths between people's intentions to discuss their donation decision and underlying behavioural (e.g. feeling uncomfortable talking about death related topics) and normative (e.g. partner/spouse, family members) beliefs, but not control beliefs (R2 = .33). There was a significant path between intentions to register and intentions to discuss one's donation decision.----- Conclusions: Results highlight the importance of focussing on behavioural and normative beliefs about communicating the donation decision, specifically for people who have not previously communicated their decision, and suggest potential targets for interventions designed to promote decision communication.

Impact and interest:

10 citations in Scopus
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7 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 15653
Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: organ donation, communication, theory of planned behaviour
DOI: 10.1348/135910708X339542
ISSN: 1359-107X
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100) > Health Clinical and Counselling Psychology (170106)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100) > Social and Community Psychology (170113)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Psychology & Counselling
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2008 British Psychological Society
Deposited On: 18 Nov 2008
Last Modified: 29 Feb 2012 23:56

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