QUT ePrints

Cardiovascular and splenic responses to exercise in humans

Stewart, Ian B., Warburton, Darren E.R., Hodges, Alastair N.H., & McKenzie, Donald C. (2003) Cardiovascular and splenic responses to exercise in humans. Journal of Applied Physiology, 94(4), pp. 1619-1626.

[img] PDF (157kB)
Administrators only

View at publisher (open access)

Abstract

To investigate splenic erythrocyte volume after exerciseand the effect on hematocrit- and hemoglobin-basedplasma volume equations, nine men cycled at an intensity of60% maximal O2 uptake for 5-, 10-, or 15-min duration,followed by an incremental ride to exhaustion. The reductionin spleen volume, calculated using 99mTc-labeled erythrocytes,was not significantly different among the three submaximalrides (5 min 28%, 10 min 30%, 15 min 36%;P 0.26). The incremental ride to exhaustion resulted in a56% reduction in spleen volume, which recovered to baselinelevels within 20 min. Plasma catecholamines were inverselyrelated to spleen volume after exercise (r 0.70–0.84; P 0.0001). There were no differences in red cell or total blood volume pre- to postexercise; however, a significant reduction in plasma volume was observed (18.9%; P 0.01). There was no difference between the iodinated albumin and the hematocritand hemoglobin methods of assessing plasma volume changes. These results suggest that the spleen regulates its volume in response to an intensity-dependent signal, andplasma catecholamines appear partially responsible. Splenic release of erythrocytes has no effect on indirect measures of plasma volume.

Impact and interest:

34 citations in Scopus
Search Google Scholar™
31 citations in Web of Science®

Citation counts are sourced monthly from Scopus and Web of Science® citation databases.

These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually different. Some works are not in either database and no count is displayed. Scopus includes citations from articles published in 1996 onwards, and Web of Science® generally from 1980 onwards.

Citations counts from the Google Scholar™ indexing service can be viewed at the linked Google Scholar™ search.

ID Code: 1604
Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: Articles free to read on journal website after 12 months
Additional URLs:
Keywords: spleen, plasma volume, hematocrit, hemoglobin, plasma catecholamines
DOI: 10.1152/japplphysiol.00040.2002
ISSN: 1522-1601, 8750-7587
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > HUMAN MOVEMENT AND SPORTS SCIENCE (110600) > Exercise Physiology (110602)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2003 American Physiological Society
Deposited On: 16 Jun 2005
Last Modified: 03 Feb 2015 03:16

Export: EndNote | Dublin Core | BibTeX

Repository Staff Only: item control page