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Identifying sources of stress and level of job satisfaction amongst registered nurses within the first three years of work as a registered nurse in Brunei Darussalam

Damit, Abd Rahim (2007) Identifying sources of stress and level of job satisfaction amongst registered nurses within the first three years of work as a registered nurse in Brunei Darussalam. Masters by Research thesis, Queensland University of Technology.

Abstract

Method

This study used a descriptive correlational study design to examine new nurses within the first three years of work as a registered nurses' perception of stress and level of job satisfaction in today's complex clinical nursing working environment. Data was collected through distribution of self administered questionnaires, which comprised 59 items of Expanded Nursing Stress Scale (French, Lenton, Walters and Eyles, 1995) and the two part measurement tool of Index of Work Satisfaction Survey (Stamps, 2001). This questionnaire was distributed to 120 new registered nurses working in Raja Isteri Pengiran Anak Saleha Hospital (R.I.P.A.S.), the main referral hospital in Brunei Darussalam. The sample consisted of both male and female registered nurses (RN) who had less than three years working experience in nursing.

Results

Responses to the Expanded Nursing Stress Scale (ENSS) identified that the new registered nurses rated their Uncertainty Concerning Treatment as highly stressful events that frequently occurred in the workplace. The study findings also revealed that the level of stress and the common stressors in new registered nurses within the first three years of work as a registered nurses were similar irrespective of whether they were working in the speciality units or in general wards. Results for Index Work Satisfaction Survey (IWSS) Part A and B also suggested that there was no significant difference on the levels of job satisfaction in both groups of new registered nurses, with the majority of nurse choosing Professional Status as the most important component.

Conclusion

Results of this study are likely to have important implications for nursing education, administration, management, organisation, practice, knowledge, and research. The study findings have the potential to make a significant contribution to determining coping strategies that might help in reducing the amount of stress experienced by the new registered nurses in day to day challenging and demanding nursing roles. The study also has the potential to have wider benefits to nursing practice not just at Brunei Darussalam.

Impact and interest:

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ID Code: 16608
Item Type: QUT Thesis (Masters by Research)
Supervisor: Yates, Patricia
Keywords: stress, job satisfaction, nursing, Brunei Darussalam
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Schools > School of Nursing
Department: Faculty of Health
Institution: Queensland University of Technology
Copyright Owner: Copyright Abd Rahim Damit
Deposited On: 03 Dec 2008 14:06
Last Modified: 29 Oct 2011 05:50

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