QUT ePrints

Identifying the Attitudinal, Normative, and Control Beliefs Underlying Psychologists' Willingness to Integrate Complementary and Alternative Therapies into Psychological Practice

Wilson, Lee-Ann M. & White, Katherine M. (2008) Identifying the Attitudinal, Normative, and Control Beliefs Underlying Psychologists' Willingness to Integrate Complementary and Alternative Therapies into Psychological Practice. In Summers, J. (Ed.) Psychology Leading Change 2008: Proceedings of the 43rd APS annual conference, September 23-27, 2008, Hobart.

View at publisher

Abstract

The use of complementary and alternative therapies (CAT) has risen steadily over recent years and individuals with mental health disorders are more likely to utilise CAT than are other members of the general public. Drawing on the belief basis of the Theory of Planned Behaviour, the present research investigated the beliefs that differentiated between psychologists who were high and low on willingness or intention to integrate CAT by either recommending CAT to clients or referring to CAT practitioners. Participants, 122 practicing psychologists, completed a questionnaire assessing their attitudinal, normative, and control beliefs relating to CAT integration. A number of the beliefs discriminated between psychologists who were or were not willing or intending to integrate CAT into their psychological practice. These findings can inform relevant governing bodies within psychology as policy is developed in relation to CAT integration.

Impact and interest:

Citation countsare sourced monthly from Scopus and Web of Science® citation databases.

These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually different. Some works are not in either database and no count is displayed. Scopus includes citations from articles published in 1996 onwards, and Web of Science® generally from 1980 onwards.

Citations counts from the Google Scholar™ indexing service can be viewed at the linked Google Scholar™ search.

Full-text downloads:

161 since deposited on 10 Dec 2008
38 in the past twelve months

Full-text downloadsdisplays the total number of times this work’s files (e.g., a PDF) have been downloaded from QUT ePrints as well as the number of downloads in the previous 365 days. The count includes downloads for all files if a work has more than one.

ID Code: 16780
Item Type: Conference Paper
Additional Information: The author-version of this article will be available 12 months after publication. For more information, please refer to the publisher's website (see hypertext link) or contact the author.
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100) > Social and Community Psychology (170113)
Divisions: Current > Research Centres > Centre for Health Research
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Psychology & Counselling
Current > Schools > School of Public Health & Social Work
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2008 The Australian Psychological Society
Deposited On: 10 Dec 2008 15:18
Last Modified: 29 Feb 2012 23:48

Export: EndNote | Dublin Core | BibTeX

Repository Staff Only: item control page