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Characterisation of chicken campylobacter jejuni isolates using resolution optimised single nucleotide polymorphisms and binary gene markers

Merchant-Patel, Shreema, Blackall, Patrick J. , Templeton, Jillian , Price, Erin P., Miflin, Jeanetta , Huygens, Flavia, & Giffard, Philip M. (2008) Characterisation of chicken campylobacter jejuni isolates using resolution optimised single nucleotide polymorphisms and binary gene markers. International Journal of Food Microbiology, 128(2), pp. 304-308.

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Abstract

The principal objective of this study was to determine if Campylobacter jejuni genotyping methods based upon resolution optimised sets of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and binary genetic markers were capable of identifying epidemiologically linked clusters of chicken-derived isolates. Eighty-eight C. jejuni isolates of known flaA RFLP type were included in the study. They encompassed three groups of ten isolates that were obtained at the same time and place and possessed the same flaA type. These were regarded as being epidemiologically linked. Twenty-six unlinked C. jejuni flaA type I isolates were included to test the ability of SNP and binary typing to resolve isolates that were not resolved by flaA RFLP. The remaining isolates were of different flaA types. All isolates were typed by real-time PCR interrogation of the resolution optimised sets of SNPs and binary markers. According to each typing method, the three epidemiologically linked clusters were three different clones that were well resolved from the other isolates. The 26 unlinked C. jejuni flaA type I isolates were resolved into 14 SNP-binary types, indicating that flaA typing can be unreliable for revealing epidemiological linkage. Comparison of the data with data from a fully typed set of isolates associated with human infection revealed that abundant lineages in the chicken isolates that were also found in the human isolates belonged to clonal complex (CC) -21 and CC-353, with the usually rare C-353 member ST-524 being especially abundant in the chicken collection. The chicken isolates selected to be diverse according to flaA were also diverse according to SNP and binary typing. It was observed that CC-48 was absent in the chicken isolates, despite being very common in Australian human infection isolates, indicating that this may be a major cause of human disease that is not chicken associated.

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8 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 17319
Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: Published version removed. Copyright policy does not allow published version to be posted.
Keywords: C. jejuni, SNPs, binary, gene, markers
DOI: 10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2008.09.002
ISSN: 0168-1605
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES (060000) > MICROBIOLOGY (060500) > Microbial Genetics (060503)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES (060000) > MICROBIOLOGY (060500) > Infectious Agents (060502)
Divisions: Past > QUT Faculties & Divisions > Faculty of Science and Technology
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2008 Elsevier
Deposited On: 03 Feb 2009 08:30
Last Modified: 29 Feb 2012 23:45

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