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Impact of an intensive nursing education course on nurses' knowledge, confidence, attitudes, and perceived skills in the care of patients with cancer

Steginga, Suzanne K., Dunn, Jeffrey, Dewar, Anne Marie, McCarthy, Alexandra, Yates, Patsy, & Beadle, Geoff (2005) Impact of an intensive nursing education course on nurses' knowledge, confidence, attitudes, and perceived skills in the care of patients with cancer. Oncology Nursing Forum, 32(2), pp. 375-381.

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Abstract

Purpose/Objectives: To evaluate the impact of a cancer nursing education course on RNs.

Design: Quasi-experimental, longitudinal, pretest/post-test design, with a follow-up assessment six weeks after the completion of the nursing education course.

Setting: Urban, nongovernment, cancer control agency in Australia.

Sample: 53 RNs, of whom 93% were female, with a mean age of 44.6 years and a mean of 16.8 years of experience in nursing; 86% of the nurses resided and worked in regional areas outside of the state capital.

Methods: Scales included the Intervention With Psychosocial Needs: Perceived Importance and Skill Level Scale, Palliative Care Quiz for Nurses, Breast Cancer Knowledge, Preparedness for Cancer Nursing, and Satisfaction With Learning. Data were analyzed using multiple analysis of variance and paired t tests.

Main Research Variables: Cancer nursing-related knowledge, preparedness for cancer nursing, and attitudes toward and perceived skills in the psychosocial care of patients with cancer and their families.

Findings: Compared to nurses in the control group, nurses who attended the nursing education course improved in their cancer nursing- related knowledge, preparedness for cancer nursing, and attitudes toward and perceived skills in the psychosocial care of patients with cancer and their families. Improvements were evident at course completion and were maintained at the six-week follow-up assessment.

Conclusions: The nursing education course was effective in improving nurses’ scores on all outcome variables.

Implications for Nursing: Continuing nursing education courses that use intensive mode timetabling, small group learning, and a mix of teaching methods, including didactic and interactive approaches and clinical placements, are effective and have the potential to improve nursing practice in oncology.

Impact and interest:

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15 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 1732
Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: Self-archiving of the author-version is not yet supported by this publisher. For more information, please refer to the journal’s website (see link) or contact the author. Author contact details: p.yates@qut.edu.au
DOI: 10.1188/05.ONF.375-381
ISSN: 0190-535X
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > NURSING (111000) > Nursing not elsewhere classified (111099)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Nursing
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2005 Oncology Nursing Society
Deposited On: 30 Nov 2006
Last Modified: 29 Oct 2013 14:55

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