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Lymphedema after gynecological cancer treatment: Prevalence, correlates, and supportive care needs

Beesley, Vanessa L., Janda, Monika, Eakin, Elizabeth G., Obermair, Andreas, & Battistutta, Diana (2007) Lymphedema after gynecological cancer treatment: Prevalence, correlates, and supportive care needs. Cancer, 109(12), pp. 2607-2614.

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Few studies have evaluated lymphedema following gynecological cancer. The aim of this research was to establish the prevalence, correlates and supportive care needs of gynecological cancer survivors who develop lymphedema.----- METHODS: In 2004, a population-based cross-sectional mail survey (56% response rate) was completed by 802 gynecological cancer survivors. The questionnaire included demographic questions, a validated, generic supportive care needs measure, and a supplementary, newly-developed, lymphedema needs module.----- RESULTS: Ten percent (95% CI: 8-12%) of participants reported being diagnosed with lymphedema and a further 15% (95% CI: 13-17%) reported undiagnosed ‘symptomatic’ lower limb swelling. Diagnosed lymphedema was more prevalent (36%) amongst vulvar cancer survivors. For cervical cancer survivors, those who had radiotherapy or who had lymph nodes removed had higher odds of developing swelling. For uterine and ovarian cancer survivors, those who had lymph nodes removed or who were overweight or obese had higher odds of developing swelling. Gynecological cancer survivors with lymphedema had higher supportive care needs in the information and symptom management domains compared to those with no swelling.----- CONCLUSIONS: This population-based study provides evidence that lymphedema is a morbidity experienced by a significant proportion of gynecological cancer survivors and that there are considerable levels of associated unmet need. Women at risk of lymphedema would benefit from instructions about early signs and symptoms and provision of referral information.

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ID Code: 17349
Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: Self-archiving of the author-version in institutional repositories is not currently supported by this publisher. For more information, please refer to the journal's website (see hypertext link) or contact the author This study was made possible by funding support from the Queensland Cancer Fund and access to participants through the Queensland Gynaecological Cancer Registry at Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital. We thank A/Prof Joanne Aitken, Dr Jeff Dunn, A/Prof Suzanne Steginga, Dr Sandi Hayes and John Gower for their guidance and support on this project; Dan Jackson for facilitation of registry data; the project staff including: Jessica Howie, Shirley Neill, Loretta McKinnon, and Neil and Dianne Swift; and the women who gave their time to participate in the survey.
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Keywords: Lymphedema, Morbidity, Supportive Care, Gynecologic Carcinoma
DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22684
ISSN: 0008-543X
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > ONCOLOGY AND CARCINOGENESIS (111200)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Health Promotion (111712)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Preventive Medicine (111716)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified (111799)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Public Health & Social Work
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2008 American Cancer Society.
Deposited On: 13 May 2009 09:18
Last Modified: 29 Feb 2012 23:38

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