QUT ePrints

The effect of an incremental increase in exercise on appetite, eating behaviour and energy balance in lean men and women feeding ad libitum

Whybrow, Stephen, Hughes, Darren A., Ritz, Patrick, Johnstone, Alexandra M., Horgan, Graham W., King, Neil A., Blundell, John E., & Stubbs, R. James (2008) The effect of an incremental increase in exercise on appetite, eating behaviour and energy balance in lean men and women feeding ad libitum. British Journal Of Nutrition, 100(5), pp. 1109-1115.

[img] Accepted Version (MS Word 181kB)
Administrators only | Request a copy from author

View at publisher

Abstract

The effects of incremental exercise on appetite, energy intake (EI), expenditure (EE) and balance (EB) in lean men and women were examined. Six men (age 29·7 (sd 5·9) years, weight 75·2 (sd 15·3) kg, height 1·75 (sd 0·11) m) and six women (age 24·7 (sd 5·9) years, weight 66·7 (sd 9·10) kg, height 1·70 (sd 0·09) m) were each studied three times during a 16 d protocol, corresponding to no additional exercise (Nex), moderate-intensity exercise (Mex; 1·5–2·0 MJ/d) and high-intensity exercise (Hex; 3·0–4·0 MJ/d) regimens. Subjects were fed to EB during days 1–2, and during days 3–16 they fed ad libitum from a medium-fat diet of constant composition. Daily EE, assessed using the doubly labelled water method, was 9·2, 11·6 and 13·7 MJ/d (P < 0·001; sed 0·45) for the women and 12·2, 14·0 and 16·7 MJ/d (P = 0·007; sed 1·11) for the men on the Nex, Mex and Hex treatments, respectively. EI was 8·3, 8·6 and 9·9 MJ/d (P = 0·118; sed 0·72) for the women and 10·6, 11·6 and 12·0 MJ/d (P = 0·031; sed 0·47) for the men, respectively. On average, subjects compensated for about 30 % of the exercise-induced energy deficit. However, the degree of compensation varied considerably among individuals. The present study captured the initial compensation in EI for exercise-induced energy deficits. Total compensation would take a matter of weeks.

Impact and interest:

40 citations in Scopus
Search Google Scholar™
34 citations in Web of Science®

Citation countsare sourced monthly from Scopus and Web of Science® citation databases.

These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually different. Some works are not in either database and no count is displayed. Scopus includes citations from articles published in 1996 onwards, and Web of Science® generally from 1980 onwards.

Citations counts from the Google Scholar™ indexing service can be viewed at the linked Google Scholar™ search.

ID Code: 17390
Item Type: Journal Article
Additional URLs:
Keywords: Exercise, Appetite, Energy Balance, Feeding Behaviour, Human Studies
DOI: 10.1017/S0007114508968240
ISSN: 0007-1145
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > AGRICULTURAL AND VETERINARY SCIENCES (070000) > ANIMAL PRODUCTION (070200)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > HUMAN MOVEMENT AND SPORTS SCIENCE (110600) > Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified (110699)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > NUTRITION AND DIETETICS (111100) > Public Nutrition Intervention (111104)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Exercise & Nutrition Sciences
Deposited On: 27 Apr 2009 07:49
Last Modified: 29 Feb 2012 23:44

Export: EndNote | Dublin Core | BibTeX

Repository Staff Only: item control page