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The supremacy of ignorance over instruction and of numbers over knowledge

Hartley, John (2008) The supremacy of ignorance over instruction and of numbers over knowledge. Journalism Studies, 9(5), pp. 679-691.

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Abstract

I argue that a divergence between popular culture as ‘‘object’’ and ‘‘subject’’ of journalism emerged during the 19th century in Britain. It accounts not only for different practices of journalism, but also for differences in the study of journalism, as manifested in journalism studies and cultural studies, respectively. The paper offers an historical account to show that popular culture was the source of the first mass circulation journalism, via the pauper press, but that it was later incorporated into the mechanisms of modern government for a very different purpose, the theorist of which was Walter Bagehot. Journalism’s polarity was reversed*it turned from ‘‘subjective’’ to ‘‘objective.’’ The paper concludes with a discussion of YouTube and the resurgence of self-representation, using the resources of popular culture, in current election campaigns. Are we witnessing a further reversal of polarity, where popular culture and self-representation once again becomes the ‘‘subject’’ of journalism?

Impact and interest:

2 citations in Web of Science®
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ID Code: 18072
Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: Self-archiving of the published-version is not yet supported by this publisher. For more information, please refer to the journal’s website (see hypertext link) or contact the author.
Keywords: English constitution, pauper press, popular culture, subject/object, YouTube
DOI: 10.1080/14616700802207607
ISSN: 1461-670X
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN CREATIVE ARTS AND WRITING (190000) > JOURNALISM AND PROFESSIONAL WRITING (190300) > Journalism Studies (190301)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > LANGUAGES COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE (200000) > COMMUNICATION AND MEDIA STUDIES (200100) > Media Studies (200104)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > LANGUAGES COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE (200000) > CULTURAL STUDIES (200200) > Cultural Studies not elsewhere classified (200299)
Divisions: Current > Research Centres > ARC Centre of Excellence for Creative Industries and Innovation
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Creative Industries Faculty
Past > Institutes > Institute for Creative Industries and Innovation
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2008 Routledge
Deposited On: 19 Feb 2009 11:04
Last Modified: 29 Feb 2012 23:50

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