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Suppressive effects of ultraviolet radiation on the immune system

Song, Qiru & Tong, Shilu (2008) Suppressive effects of ultraviolet radiation on the immune system. Environmental Health, 8(2), pp. 42-57.

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Abstract

Human exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) can exert a variety of biological effects, including induction of skin cancer, exacerbation of infectious diseases, premature skin ageing and inhibition of the immune system. The immunosuppressive properties of UVR are of major biological relevance since suppression of the immune system is related to a variety of diseases, ranging from the exacerbation of infectious diseases to the induction of skin cancer. The evidence shows that UVR can influence the immune system, cause damage to DNA, disturb the metabolism of Urocanic acid (UCA), and alter cellular redox equilibrium leading to free radical formation and membrane lipid peroxidation. Finally, UVR can induce contact hypersensitivity (CHS) and delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH). These changes might be related to local and systematic immunosuppression. Hence, understanding the immunosuppressive mechanisms of UVR in human diseases becomes of primary importance in the protection and improvement of human health.

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ID Code: 18665
Item Type: Journal Article
Additional URLs:
Keywords: Immune system, Suppressive effect, Ultraviolet radiation
ISSN: 1444-5212
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety (111705)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Public Health & Social Work
Deposited On: 07 May 2009 22:03
Last Modified: 29 Feb 2012 23:50

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