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Quality of life of post-AMI patients and their partners: Implications for managing and preventing heart disease

McDowell, Jan & Oldenburg, Brian F. (2002) Quality of life of post-AMI patients and their partners: Implications for managing and preventing heart disease. International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 9(S1), p. 183.

Abstract

To date, little evidence on QOL and functioning post-AMI has been derived from studies of post-AMI couples, rather than individual patients. A prospective study (N = 86 couples) has investigated health and relationship aspects of couples’ quality of life during the first 6 months following an AMI. Patients were adult males younger than 75 years who had experienced a first AMI, and their female partners. The results suggest that patients’ physical wellbeing is clinically poorer at 1 and 6 months than that of married/defacto males of the same age in the general population. Patients’ and partners’ emotional well-being is clinically poorer than age and gender-specific males and females from the general population respectively, at 1 month but not at 6 months. For both patients and partners, there is subgroup variation in health-related quality of life at both of these time points. The evidence also suggests that the nature of a couple’s relationship affects emotional well-being following a heart attack. After controlling for concurrent physical well-being, the length of time couples had lived together, and prior levels of emotional well-being, it was revealed that increased use of protective buffering behaviour, such as hiding concerns and negative feelings, by partners at 1 month predicts better emotional well-being in patients at 6 months. In contrast, patients’ increased use of protective buffering behaviour at 1 month tends to be associated with poorer emotional well-being on their part. Within dyads a greater discrepancy in the way in which members buffer each other at 1 month predicts poorer emotional well-being for patients at 6 months. Partners have better emotional well-being at 6 months if they perceive that their relationship is well adjusted at 1 month. These research findings have important implications for management and prevention of heart disease.

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ID Code: 1887
Item Type: Journal Article
Additional URLs:
ISSN: 1070-5503
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > NURSING (111000) > Clinical Nursing - Tertiary (Rehabilitative) (111004)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > NURSING (111000) > Clinical Nursing - Primary (Preventative) (111002)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2002 Taylor & Francis
Copyright Statement: This is an electronic version of an article published in [International Journal of Behavioral Medicine 9(S1):183.].
Deposited On: 13 Oct 2005
Last Modified: 26 Nov 2009 11:49

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