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Area disadvantage, individual socio-economic position, and premature cancer mortality in Australia 1998 to 2000 : a multilevel analysis

Bentley, Rebecca, Kavanagh, Anne Marie, Subramanian, S. V., & Turrell, Gavin (2007) Area disadvantage, individual socio-economic position, and premature cancer mortality in Australia 1998 to 2000 : a multilevel analysis. Cancer Causes & Control, 19(2), pp. 183-193.

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Abstract

Objective: To examine associations between area and individual socio-economic characteristics and premature cancer mortality using multilevel analysis.--- Methods: We modeled cancer mortality among 25–64-year-old men and women (n = 16,340) between 1998 and 2000 in Australia. Socio-economic characteristics of Statistical Local Areas (n = 1,317) were measured using an Index of Relative Socio-economic Disadvantage (quintiles), and individual socio-economic position was measured by occupation (professionals, white and blue collar).--- Results: After adjustment for within-area variation in age and occupation, the probability of premature cancer mortality was highest in the most disadvantaged areas for all-cancer mortality for men (RR 1.48 95% CI 1.35–1.63) and women (RR 1.30 95% CI 1.18–1.43) and for lung cancer mortality for men (1.91 95% CI 1.63–2.25) and women (1.51 95% CI 1.04–2.18). Men in blue collar occupations had a higher rate of cancer mortality (RR 1.57 95% CI 1.50–1.65) and lung cancer mortality (RR 2.31 95 % CI 2.09–2.56), whereas men in white collar occupations had a lower all-cancer mortality rate (RR 0.78 95% CI 0.72–0.85). Compared with professionals, women in white collar occupations had an all-cancer mortality rate that was lower (RR 0.85 95% CI 0.80–0.90). When deaths from breast cancer were excluded, women in blue collar occupations had a significantly higher all-cancer mortality rate than professionals (RR 1.12 95% CI 1.02–1.22).--- Conclusions: Area disadvantage and individual socio-economic position were independently associated with premature cancer mortality, suggesting that interventions to reduce inequalities should focus on places and people.

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ID Code: 19094
Item Type: Journal Article
Additional URLs:
Keywords: Cancer, Mortality, Socio-economic factors, Socio-economic status, Australia
DOI: 10.1007/s10552-007-9084-7
ISSN: 0957-5243 (print) 1573-7225 (online)
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > ONCOLOGY AND CARCINOGENESIS (111200)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Epidemiology (111706)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Schools > School of Public Health & Social Work
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Deposited On: 21 Apr 2009 09:46
Last Modified: 07 Sep 2012 11:24

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