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Closed road driving performance : evidence for a frontal speech advantage for older drivers

Chaparro, Alex & Wood, Joanne M. (2008) Closed road driving performance : evidence for a frontal speech advantage for older drivers. Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science.

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Abstract

Purpose: previous research using a driving simulator has demonstrated that drivers find it easier to shadow an auditory channel when the information is presented through a speaker positioned directly in front of them, rather than one positioned to their side. the aim of this study was to determine whether this effect is also obtained under more realistic driving conditions where participants drive a vehicle around a closed road course and assess whether older adults, who experience greater difficulties under dual-task conditions, derive similar advantages from changes in speaker position------

Methods: The impact of the location of an auditory secondary task on measures of driving performance including the recognition of road signs, detection and avoidance of large low contrast hazards, gap judgment and time to complete the course was obtained for young and older participants as they drove along a closed driving course. Then young (Mean age = 26.9 years, SD=4.2) and nine elderly (Mean age = 72.4 years, SD=4.2) participants with normal corrected vision completed the experiment.

Impact and interest:

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ID Code: 19189
Item Type: Other
Additional URLs:
Keywords: Ageing, Perception, Visual search
ISSN: 0146-0404
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > OPTOMETRY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY (111300) > Vision Science (111303)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Optometry & Vision Science
Deposited On: 13 May 2009 10:54
Last Modified: 22 Apr 2010 02:51

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