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Older persons' perception of risk of falling : implications for fall-prevention campaigns

Hughes, Kellie, van Beurden, Eric, Eakin, Elizabeth G., Barnett, Lisa M., Patterson, Elizabeth, Backhouse, Jan, Jones, Sue, Hauser, Darren, Beard, John R., & Newman, Beth M. (2008) Older persons' perception of risk of falling : implications for fall-prevention campaigns. American Journal of Public Health, 98(2), pp. 351-357.

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Abstract

Objectives: We examined older people’s attitudes about falls and implications for the design of fall-prevention awareness campaigns.---

Methods: We assessed data from (1) computer-assisted telephone surveys conducted in 2002 with Australians 60 years and older in Northern Rivers, New South Wales (site of a previous fall-prevention program; n=1601), and Wide Bay, Queensland (comparison community; n=1601), and (2) 8 focus groups (n=73).---

Results: Participants from the previous intervention site were less likely than were comparison participants to agree that falls are not preventable (odds ratio [OR]=0.76; 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.65, 0.90) and more likely to rate the prevention of falls a high priority (OR=1.31; 95% CI=1.09, 1.57). There was no difference between the groups for self-perceived risk of falls; more than 60% rated their risk as low. Those with a low perceived risk were more likely to be men, younger, partnered, and privately insured, and to report better health and no history of falls. Focus group data indicated that older people preferred messages that emphasized health and independence rather than falls.---

Conclusions: Although older people accepted traditional fall-prevention messages, most viewed them as not personally relevant. Messages that promote health and independence may be more effective.

Impact and interest:

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28 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 19613
Item Type: Journal Article
Additional URLs:
Keywords: Aging, Health Education, Health Promotion, Injury/Emergency Care/Violence, Prevention, Public Health Practice
DOI: 10.2105/AJPH.2007.115055
ISSN: 0090-0036
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified (111799)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Aged Health Care (111702)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Public Health & Social Work
Deposited On: 20 Apr 2009 12:50
Last Modified: 29 Feb 2012 23:49

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