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Technology-dependent children and their families

Wang, Kai-Wei Katherine & Barnard, Alan G. (2004) Technology-dependent children and their families. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 45(1), pp. 36-46.

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Abstract

Background. Advances in medical technology and nursing care have enabled children who rely on long-term medical and technical support to reunite with their families and community. The impact of discharging these children into the community involves a number of unprecedented social implications that warrant policy consideration. To begin with, an effort must be made to understand the phenomenon of caring for technology-dependent children living at home. Aim. The aim of this paper is to provide a comprehensive literature review on caring for technology-dependent children living at home. Methods. The review was conducted via keyword searches using various electronic databases. These included CINAHL, MEDLINE, Social Science Index, Sociological Abstracts, Australian Family and Society Abstracts, and the Australian Bureau of Statistics. The articles and books found were examined for commonality and difference, significant themes were extracted, and the strength of the research methods and subsequent evidence were critiqued. Findings. In this paper, themes relating to home care for technology-dependent children and their families are elucidated and summarized. These are: chronic illness and children; the impact of paediatric home care on children; the uniqueness of technology-dependent children and their families; and parents' experience of paediatric home care. Discussion. Contentious issues, relevant to the social life of these children and their families, are raised and are discussed with the intention of extending awareness and provoking further debate among key stakeholders. These issues include: the changed meaning of home; family dynamics; social isolation; saving costs for whom?; shifts in responsibility; and parent-professional relationships. Conclusion. More research is needed in the arena of paediatric home care, to facilitate relevant policy formation and implementation.

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46 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 2014
Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: paediatric home care, technology, dependent, chronic illness, Family, community nursing
DOI: 10.1046/j.1365-2648.2003.02858.x
ISSN: 0309-2402
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PAEDIATRICS AND REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE (111400) > Paediatrics (111403)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Care for Disabled (111703)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > NURSING (111000) > Clinical Nursing - Secondary (Acute Care) (111003)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > CARDIOVASCULAR MEDICINE AND HAEMATOLOGY (110200) > Respiratory Diseases (110203)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > NURSING (111000)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2004 Blackwell Publishing
Copyright Statement: The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com
Deposited On: 07 Mar 2006
Last Modified: 29 Feb 2012 22:59

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