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Anterior cingulate glutamate-glutamine levels predict symptom severity in women with obsessive-compulsive disorder

Yucel, Murat, Wood, Stephen J., Wellard, R. Mark, Harrison, Ben J., Fornito, Alex, Pujol, Jesus, Velakoulis, Dennis, & Pantelis, Christos (2008) Anterior cingulate glutamate-glutamine levels predict symptom severity in women with obsessive-compulsive disorder. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 42(6), pp. 467-477.

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Abnormalities of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) have consistently been identified in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), but very few studies have examined the biochemical basis of such changes. The purpose of the present study was to investigate how ACC biochemistry in OCD varies as a function of gender, hemisphere, subregion, and symptomatology. METHOD: 3 T proton-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used to probe ACC biochemistry in 20 OCD patients (10 male, 10 female) and a comparable group of 26 healthy comparison subjects. Data were acquired from the left and right dorsal and rostral subregions of the ACC. Metabolites assessed included N-acetylaspartate (NAA), glutamate-glutamine (Glx), choline-containing compounds (Cho), creatine/phosphocreatine (Cr), and myoinositol-containing compounds (mI). RESULTS: Female OCD patients had significantly reduced levels of Glx in all but one subregion of the ACC when compared to matched controls. Levels of Glx were correlated with clinical measures of symptom severity in female but not male patients. State levels of anxiety and depression did not explain this association. In addition, both male and female OCD patients had relatively higher concentrations of mI in their right ACC (rostral and dorsal) compared with healthy controls. No other compounds had any statistically significant group differences, nor were the concentrations of any other compounds correlated with symptom measures. CONCLUSIONS: To the authors' knowledge this is the first study to demonstrate gender-specific neurochemical changes in OCD. Although these findings are tentative and require replication, they raise the possibility that MRS techniques may be of use in objectively monitoring patient progress and assessing the effectiveness of various treatments.

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ID Code: 21213
Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: glutamate, obsessive-compulsive, MRI,, proton, sex
ISSN: 1440-1614
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > CLINICAL SCIENCES (110300) > Psychiatry (incl. Psychotherapy) (110319)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100) > Biological Psychology (Neuropsychology Psychopharmacology Physiological Psychology) (170101)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > MEDICAL BIOCHEMISTRY AND METABOLOMICS (110100)
Divisions: Past > QUT Faculties & Divisions > Faculty of Science and Technology
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Past > Schools > School of Physical & Chemical Sciences
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2008 Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
Copyright Statement: This is an electronic version of an article published in Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry 42 (6) p. 467-477. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry is available online at informaworldTM
Deposited On: 06 Oct 2009 09:59
Last Modified: 29 Feb 2012 23:53

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