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Do centralised skin screening clinics increase participation in melanoma screening (Australia)?

Janda, Monika, Lowe, John B. , Elwood, Mark , Ring, Ian T. , Youl, Philippa H. , & Aitken, Joanne F. (2006) Do centralised skin screening clinics increase participation in melanoma screening (Australia)? Cancer Causes and Control: An International Journal of Studies of Cancer in Human Populations, 17(2), pp. 161-168.

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Abstract

Objective
To compare during the first 12 months of a 3-year randomised community-based trial of population screening for melanoma three methods of screening delivery: skin screening within day-to-day primary care (Group A); screening in dedicated skin screening clinics either organised privately by local physicians (Group B); or organised centrally with participants referred back to their physicians for definitive diagnosis and management (Group C). Methods
The trial involved 18 regional communities in Queensland, Australia. Of the nine communities randomised to the intervention group, three communities were allocated to each of the Groups A, B or C. All intervention communities received a community education programme and an education and support programme for primary care physicians. The self-reported prevalence of clinical skin examination was assessed by surveying 3,110 residents (66.9% participation rate) aged ≥30 years by telephone at baseline, and 14,060 residents (70.9% participation rate) by self-administered mailed questionnaire at 12-month follow-up. Results
At baseline the prevalence of skin screening did not differ between intervention and control communities. At 12-month follow-up, participants within intervention communities reported skin screening significantly more frequently (20.9% versus 10.9%; p<0.001). Within intervention communities, the prevalence of clinical skin examinations in Group A was similar to that of control communities (12.6% and 10.9%; p = 0.33). Communities in Group B (16.5%; p = 0.001) and Group C (27.1%; p<0.001) reported significantly higher prevalence of clinical examinations than the control group. Conclusions
The provision of centrally organised skin screening clinics significantly increases skin screening rates and may have relevance for future melanoma control programmes

Impact and interest:

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8 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 22236
Item Type: Journal Article
Additional URLs:
Keywords: Melanoma, Screening, Randomized-Controlled Trial
DOI: 10.1007/s10552-005-0419-y
ISSN: 0957-5243
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > ONCOLOGY AND CARCINOGENESIS (111200) > Oncology and Carcinogenesis not elsewhere classified (111299)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Health Promotion (111712)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Preventive Medicine (111716)
Divisions: Current > Research Centres > Centre for Health Research
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Public Health & Social Work
Copyright Owner: Springer-Verlag 2006
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Deposited On: 17 Jun 2009 23:08
Last Modified: 29 Feb 2012 23:25

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