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The humanities, creative arts and the innovation agenda

Cunningham, Stuart D. (2004) The humanities, creative arts and the innovation agenda. In Wissler, Rod, Haseman, Brad, Wallace, Sue-Anne, & Keane, Michael (Eds.) Innovation in Australian arts, media and design: Fresh Challenges for the Tertiary Sector. Post Pressed, Flaxton, Qld, pp. 221-232.

Abstract

This time, the debate about the humanities is different.

This time the broad context is the relation of the humanities and creative arts to the innovation agenda and the knowledge economy. It is about the humanities and the creative arts, a crucial but little thought-through connection that is assuming centre stage for reasons that are the burden of this paper but also, and relatedly, because of the growth and integration of creative arts courses and staff into the university system over the last decade.

It’s not, then, a debate about the humanities and creative arts as the ding an sich - the imponderable thing in itself. The current debate is empirical, it’s evidence-based, and it’s about a wider set of issues about the new knowledge economy that humanists and creatives are joining, not initiating amongst ourselves.

My discussion follows these lines: • What’s wrong with the standard innovation and R&D agendas in a knowledge-based economy? • Why should the humanities and creative arts disciplines be in innovation and R&D agendas? • How innovation and R&D policies are evolving that show a way ahead.

Impact and interest:

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ID Code: 2464
Item Type: Book Chapter
Additional URLs:
ISBN: 1876682655
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > LANGUAGES COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE (200000) > CULTURAL STUDIES (200200)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION (160500) > Communications and Media Policy (160503)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN CREATIVE ARTS AND WRITING (190000) > JOURNALISM AND PROFESSIONAL WRITING (190300)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION (160500) > Policy and Administration not elsewhere classified (160599)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION (160500) > Arts and Cultural Policy (160502)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Creative Industries Faculty
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2004 Post Pressed
Copyright Statement: This is the author’s manuscript version of the work. It is posted here with permission of the copyright owner for your personal use only. No further distribution is permitted. For more information about this book please refer to the publisher's website (see link) or contact the author. Author contact details: s.cunningham@qut.edu.au
Deposited On: 09 Nov 2005
Last Modified: 09 Jun 2010 22:28

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