QUT ePrints

Benefits of treating a sandy soil with a cross-linked type polyacrylamide

Sivapalan, Siva (2006) Benefits of treating a sandy soil with a cross-linked type polyacrylamide. Australian Journal of Experimental Agriculture, 46(4), pp. 579-584.

View at publisher

Abstract

The productivity of sandy soils is mostly limited by their low water holding capacity and excessive deep percolation losses, which reduce the efficiency of water and fertiliser use, by plants. The effect of a cross-linked type polyacrylamide, ALCOSORB 400, on water holding capacity of a sandy soil, Siliceous Sands, was studied under the laboratory and glasshouse conditions. Water holding capacity of the soil exposed to 0.01 MPa pressure increased by 23 and 95% by adding 0.03 and 0.07% of polyacrylamide to the soil, respectively. This indicated that the soil treated with polyacrylamide was able to store more water compared with untreated soil, thereby reducing the potential losses due to deep percolation in sandy soils. However, the soil treated with polyacrylamide did not significantly increase the quantity of water released from the soil by increasing the pressure from 0.01 to 1.5 MPa. The results from the first glasshouse experiment demonstrated that the excess amount of water stored in the soil by polyacrylamide was available to plants and resulted in their higher water use and grain production. Consequently, there were 12 and 18 times increase in water use efficiency of soybean plants grown in soils treated with 0.03 and 0.07% polyacrylamide, respectively. The results from the second glasshouse experiment demonstrated that the increasing amounts of polyacrylamides in a sandy soil can extend the irrigation interval without any adverse effect on the grain yield of soybeans.

Impact and interest:

23 citations in Scopus
Search Google Scholar™
17 citations in Web of Science®

Citation countsare sourced monthly from Scopus and Web of Science® citation databases.

These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually different. Some works are not in either database and no count is displayed. Scopus includes citations from articles published in 1996 onwards, and Web of Science® generally from 1980 onwards.

Citations counts from the Google Scholar™ indexing service can be viewed at the linked Google Scholar™ search.

Full-text downloads:

1,256 since deposited on 23 Nov 2005
261 in the past twelve months

Full-text downloadsdisplays the total number of times this work’s files (e.g., a PDF) have been downloaded from QUT ePrints as well as the number of downloads in the previous 365 days. The count includes downloads for all files if a work has more than one.

ID Code: 2589
Item Type: Journal Article
Additional URLs:
Keywords: soil water holding capacity, plant water use efficiency, irrigation interval
DOI: 10.1071/EA04026
ISSN: 0816-1089
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES (050000) > SOIL SCIENCES (050300) > Soil Sciences not elsewhere classified (050399)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > AGRICULTURAL AND VETERINARY SCIENCES (070000) > CROP AND PASTURE PRODUCTION (070300) > Agronomy (070302)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES (050000) > SOIL SCIENCES (050300) > Soil Physics (050305)
Divisions: Past > QUT Faculties & Divisions > Faculty of Built Environment and Engineering
Copyright Owner: Copyright CSIRO
Copyright Statement: Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.
Deposited On: 23 Nov 2005
Last Modified: 09 Jun 2010 22:28

Export: EndNote | Dublin Core | BibTeX

Repository Staff Only: item control page