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General practitioners’ experiences of the psychological aspects in the care of a dying patient

Kelly, Brian, Varghese, Francis, Burnett, Paul, Turner, J., Robertson, Marguerite, Kelly, Patricia, Mitchell, Geoffrey K., & Treston, Pat (2008) General practitioners’ experiences of the psychological aspects in the care of a dying patient. Palliative and Supportive Care, 6(2), pp. 125-131.

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Abstract

Objective: General practitioners (GPs) play an integral role in addressing the psychological needs of palliative care patients and their families. This qualitative study investigated psychosocial issues faced by GPs in the management of patients receiving palliative care and investigated the themes relevant to the psychosocial care of dying patients.

Method: Fifteen general practitioners whose patient had been recently referred to the Mt. Olivet Palliative Home Care Services in Brisbane participated in an individual case review discussions guided by key questions within a semistructured format. These interviews focused on the psychosocial aspects of care and management of the referred patient, including aspects of the doctor/patient relationship, experience of delivering diagnosis and prognosis, addressing the psychological concerns of the patients' family, and the doctors' personal experiences, reactions, and responses. Qualitative analysis was conducted on the transcripts of these interviews.

Results: The significant themes that emerged related to perceived barriers to exploration of emotional concerns, including spiritual issues, and the discussion of prognosis and dying, the perception of patients' responses/coping styles, and the GP's personal experience of the care (usually expressed in terms of identification with patient).

Significance of results: The findings indicate the significant challenges facing clinicians in discussions with patients and families about death, to exploring the patient's emotional responses to terminal illness and spiritual concerns for the patient and family. These qualitative date indicate important tasks in the training and clinical support for doctors providing palliative care.

Impact and interest:

12 citations in Scopus
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ID Code: 26391
Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: General practitioner, Doctor–patient relationship, Qualitative, Psycho-social
DOI: 10.1017/S1478951508000205
ISSN: 1478-9523
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100) > Health Clinical and Counselling Psychology (170106)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Division of Research and Commercialisation
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2007 Cambridge University Press
Copyright Statement: Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher
Deposited On: 20 Jul 2009 11:15
Last Modified: 29 Feb 2012 23:54

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