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Psychological predictors of the propensity to omit short-response items on a high-stakes achievement test

Matters, Gabrielle & Burnett, Paul C. (2003) Psychological predictors of the propensity to omit short-response items on a high-stakes achievement test. Educational and Psychological Measurement, 63(2), pp. 239-256.

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Abstract

This article presents the findings of a study of the psychological variables that discriminate between high and low omitters on a high-stakes achievement test using a short-response format. Data were obtained from a questionnaire administered to a random sample (N = 1,908) of students prior to sitting the 1997 Queensland Core Skills (QCS) Test (N = 29,273). Fourteen psychological variables were measured including test anxiety (four subscales), emotional stability, achievement motivation, self-esteem, academic self-concept, self-estimate of ability, locus of control (three subscales), and approaches to learning (two subscales). The results were analyzed using descriptive discriminant analysis and suggested that the psychological predictors of the propensity to omit short-response items include test-irrelevant thinking and academic self-concept, with sex of candidate being a mediating variable.

Impact and interest:

6 citations in Scopus
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6 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 26837
Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: Omitted test items;, Psychological predictors of omitting, Short-response, Self-concept, Test anxiety, Sex differences in omit behavior
ISSN: 1552-3888
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Division of Research and Commercialisation
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Education
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2003 Sage Publications
Deposited On: 18 Aug 2009 09:50
Last Modified: 22 Apr 2010 03:09

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