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Older patients request more information : a survey of use of written patient education materials in general practice

McKenna, Kryss, Tooth, Leigh, King, David, Clark, Michele J., O'Rourke, Peter, Steinberg, Margaret, & de Looze, Ferdinandus (2003) Older patients request more information : a survey of use of written patient education materials in general practice. Australasian Journal on Ageing, 22(1), pp. 15-19.

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Abstract

Objectives: To determine GPs' reported use of written education materials with older patients and older patients' reported receipt of these materials. To determine GPs' and older patients' perceptions of written materials.----------

Method: Using self-report questionnaires, two populations were surveyed; a randomised sample of 50 GPs (29 males and 21 females) practising in Brisbane's southern suburbs and a convenience sample of 188 older community-dwelling people (aged over 64 years).-----------

Results: All GPs reported using written materials with patients, although 28% had not given any to the Last 10 patients. This increased to 46% when patients were older. Twenty percent of patients wanted more written information from their GP, while some GPs believed that older patients preferred verbal information and gave out written information only when they perceived patient interest. All GPs reported giving written materials at the time of consultation and over two thirds discussed the content with patients. Just over 50% of patients reported receiving written information from GPs in the Last six months and only hall of these again discussed it directly with their GP. Overall, patients were more positive than GPs about the value of written education materials.----------

Conclusions: Older patients' desire for written information may be better met if they are more assertive in requesting this of GPs and GPs may better serve their patients' needs if they make written information more readily available to them. Better access to materials and more financial incentives to give them out might also increase GPs' use of written materials.

Impact and interest:

11 citations in Scopus
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8 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 27174
Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: This study was funded by a grant from the General Practice Education Program (GPEP) in 1999 - #750. Dr Leigh Tooth was supported by a NHMRC Fellowship (#997032) while some of this research was being undertaken.
Additional URLs:
DOI: 10.1111/j.1741-6612.2003.tb00457.x
ISSN: 1440-6381
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > CLINICAL SCIENCES (110300)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > COGNITIVE SCIENCE (170200)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Public Health & Social Work
Deposited On: 12 Jul 2010 09:03
Last Modified: 11 Aug 2011 04:41

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