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Daddies, assistants and foolsbdifferentiation of male representations in present-day advertising.

Martin, Brett, Uusitalo, Liisa , & Saari, Topi (2003) Daddies, assistants and foolsbdifferentiation of male representations in present-day advertising. In European Advances in Consumer Research, Association for Consumer Research, Dublin, Ireland, pp. 228-232.

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Abstract

This paper explores the way men are represented in present-day advertising. Most gender related studies have concentrated in studying women in advertising and claim that men are still represented as the dominant gender and in more active, independent and functional roles than women. This paper asks whether this still holds for advertising in the beginning of 21st century. Many cultural changes may have broken the earlier stereotypes, for example changes in the family life, attitudes toward various sexual identities, concepts of masculinity and femininity, and changes in cultural style.

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ID Code: 28277
Item Type: Conference Paper
Additional Information: Fulltext freely available online at publishers website
Keywords: advertising, male representation, types of men
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > COMMERCE MANAGEMENT TOURISM AND SERVICES (150000) > MARKETING (150500) > Marketing Communications (150502)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > COMMERCE MANAGEMENT TOURISM AND SERVICES (150000) > MARKETING (150500) > Marketing not elsewhere classified (150599)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > COMMERCE MANAGEMENT TOURISM AND SERVICES (150000) > MARKETING (150500) > Marketing Theory (150506)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > QUT Business School
Current > Schools > School of Advertising, Marketing & Public Relations
Deposited On: 28 Oct 2009 09:30
Last Modified: 22 Jun 2011 23:36

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