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Departing from the virtual community : a discussion of the ways and means to uncover localised order in online games

Grant , Eryn (2006) Departing from the virtual community : a discussion of the ways and means to uncover localised order in online games. International Journal of Technology, Knowledge and Society, 1(6 ), pp. 13-20.

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Abstract

This paper is part one of a three part study into the collective regulation processes of players in massive multiplayer online games (MMOG). Traditionally game playing has not been classed as problematic, however with introduction of new media technologies and new ways to play games, certain contexts have become obscure, namely the localised order of ‘playing online’ or how players manage and maintain order between each other as opposed to ‘following the rules’. Principally this paper will examine concepts of ‘virtual community’. These will be illustrated as particularly unhelpful when considering how people conduct themselves in these spaces. Thus, ‘virtual community’ will be seen as critical in implicating various online behaviours as superior to other online behaviours causing obscurity and blurring actions. This obscurity is grounded by strong associations in the virtual community as logic of practise in and of itself; behaviours that fall outside this category become common sense and as such are made invisible for investigation. This paper will draw upon the theories of Basil Bernstein and Pierre Bourdieu to produce a distinction between online behaviours and ultimately make them visible for further investigation. In doing so this paper seeks to form a basis for future research where interaction in these spaces can be identified as belonging to a certain framework to inform the design of online games and applications more effectively.

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ID Code: 28610
Item Type: Journal Article
Additional URLs:
Keywords: Second Life, Virtual Community, Basil Bernstien, Harvey Sacks, Conversation Analysis
ISSN: 1832-3669
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > SOCIOLOGY (160800) > Sociology and Social Studies of Science and Technology (160808)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > SOCIOLOGY (160800) > Social Theory (160806)
Divisions: Past > QUT Faculties & Divisions > QUT Carseldine - Humanities & Human Services
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2009 Common Ground
Deposited On: 13 Nov 2009 09:49
Last Modified: 10 Jun 2010 00:09

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